Veterans Affairs Veterans Affairs

Acting Secretary of Veterans Affairs Robert Wilkie, left, is seen as President Trump announces his intention to nominate Wilkie to be the next Veterans Affairs Secretary during a summit at the East Room of the White House on Friday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, nominee for veterans affairs secretary, leaves the Dirksen Building afte meeting with Sen. Jerry Moran, R-Kan., on Tuesday. Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images

New Charges Against VA Nominee: 'Candyman' Dispensed Drugs Freely, Wrecked Car

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More than 20 military employees have shared concerns about Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, who was on Capitol Hill on Tuesday, with members and staff of the Senate Veterans' Affairs Committee, said the panel's top Democrat, Jon Tester. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

VA Nominee Accused Of Drinking On Duty, Improper Prescriptions, Sen. Tester Says

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Ousted Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin demurred from pointing a finger squarely at President Trump but described a VA riddled with political pressure and conflict. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

In this 1945 image, test subjects enter a gas chamber for a U.S. military experiment that will expose them to mustard gas. Courtesy of Edgewood Arsenal hide caption

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Courtesy of Edgewood Arsenal

Coalition forces fire a Carl Gustaf recoilless rifle during a training exercise in Afghanistan's Helmand province in 2013. Spc. Justin Young/U.S. Department of Defense/DVIDS hide caption

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Spc. Justin Young/U.S. Department of Defense/DVIDS

Do U.S. Troops Risk Brain Injury When They Fire Heavy Weapons?

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A House-approved bill would require a court hearing before a U.S. veteran is deemed mentally unfit to own a gun. Here, rifles are seen at a gun shop in Merrimack, N.H., last year. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images

Veterans Affairs Secretary-designate Dr. David Shulkin, then the undersecretary for health at the VA, testifies on Capitol Hill Feb. 1. Shulkin was confirmed on Monday. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

David Shulkin (center), the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs undersecretary of health, talks with attendees in July prior to testifying at a Senate Veterans' Affairs Committee hearing in Gilbert, Ariz. Donald Trump has selected Shulkin to lead the agency. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

Hiring Freeze And Obamacare Repeal Could Clobber Veterans Affairs

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Coning left the Marines in 2013. His wife says she thinks it's likely he had post-traumatic stress disorder, but he was never tested for it by the VA. Courtesy of the Coning family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Coning family

After A Vet's Suicide, Getting VA Benefits Can Compound A Family's Grief

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Stacy Bannerman testifies before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Military Quality of Life and Veterans Affairs in 2006. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images

After Combat Stress, Violence Can Show Up At Home

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Sue McConnell is one of more than 130 transgender veterans receiving treatment at the Tucson Veterans Affairs hospital. Jimmy Jenkins/KJZZ hide caption

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Jimmy Jenkins/KJZZ

New VA Clinic Opens For Transgender Vets

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ReWalk Robotics service engineer Tom Coulter (right) looks on as paralyzed Army veteran Gene Laureano walks using a ReWalk device on Wednesday in the Bronx, N.Y. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

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Mel Evans/AP

Daniel Harmon, a veteran of the wars in both Afghanistan and Iraq, looks out the window of his room at the Hollywood Veterans Center in Los Angeles. The facility provides housing to homeless vets. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

The U.S. Declared War On Veteran Homelessness — And It Actually Could Win

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Alan Oates was exposed to herbicides, such as Agent Orange, while serving in Vietnam in 1968. Decades after returning home, he was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, and because Congress passed the Agent Orange Act, he's able to receive VA benefits. Courtesy of Alan Oates hide caption

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Courtesy of Alan Oates

Can The Agent Orange Act Help Veterans Exposed To Mustard Gas?

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Veterans Choice Act Fails To Ease Travel Burdens For Vets In Need Of Care

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A U.S. Air Force C-123 sprays herbicides on dense jungle beside a South Vietnamese highway on May 18, 1966. This aircraft is the last in a formation of three. Spray from the other two planes can be seen ahead. U.S. Air Force via AP hide caption

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U.S. Air Force via AP

Air Force Reservists Say Agent Orange Residue Damaged Their Health

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The ferry pulls in to Friday Harbor, the only incorporated city in San Juan County, Wash. Veterans will often travel the hourlong ferry ride to reach VA services here. Patricia Murphy/KUOW hide caption

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Patricia Murphy/KUOW

In Remote Washington, Veterans Services Are Ferry Ride Away

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Grant County Veterans Service Officer Bob Kelley (right) works with World War II Army veteran Frederick Kern at the Grant County Government Building in Marion, Ind., on Monday. Aaron P. Bernstein for NPR hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein for NPR

Without Help, Navigating Benefits Can Be Overwhelming For Veterans

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George Murray, who served in Vietnam, was able to access his medical benefits from the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs relatively easily while living in Boston. But veterans living in other parts of Massachusetts, like Cape Cod, have more difficulty. Across the U.S., VA data show the unevenness in its benefit spending. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

VA Data Show Disparities In Veteran Benefits Spending

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