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high deductible

One health insurance startup charges patients extra for procedures not covered by their basic health plan. The out-of-pocket cost for a tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy might range from $900 to $3,000 extra, while a lumbar spine fusion could range from $5,000 to $10,000. Frederic Cirou/PhotoAlto/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic Cirou/PhotoAlto/Getty Images

Even for conventional medical treatments that are covered under most health insurance policies, the large copays and high deductibles have left many Americans with big bills, says a health economist, who sees the rise in medical fundraisers as worrisome. Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Patients Are Turning To GoFundMe To Fill Health Insurance Gaps

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Tessa Anklin says Covered California health plans are too expensive for her family. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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April Dembosky/KQED

Rural Californians Want Price Relief From GOP Health Bill, But Most Won't Get It

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Under Internal Revenue Service rules, high-deductible insurance plans that can link to health savings accounts can only cover preventive services, such as vaccinations and mammograms, until patients pay down their deductible. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

When your health insurer reclassifies a prescription drug you take from tier 1 to tier 2, it can sharply increase the portion of the drug's cost that you're expected to pay. Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images
Valero Doval/Ikon Images/Corbis

Patients Want To Price-Shop For Care, But Online Tools Unreliable

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Anchorage dental hygienist Victoria Cronquist pays $1,600 a month for a health insurance policy that covers four people in her family. Next year, she says, the rate is set to jump to $2,600 a month. Annie Feidt/APRN hide caption

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Annie Feidt/APRN

Steep Hikes In Insurance Rates Force Alaskans To Make Tough Choices

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Renee Mitchell says even though she has health insurance she'll have trouble paying for the eye surgery she needs to save her vision. Jim Burress/WABE hide caption

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Jim Burress/WABE

Some Insured Patients Still Skipping Care Because Of High Costs

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Tammy Boudreaux tries a tendon-stretching drill after surgery. Boudreaux was able to get much of her operation and rehabilitation covered by the insurance plan she bought via the Affordable Care Act. Carrie Feibel hide caption

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Carrie Feibel

A Cut That Won't Heal Transforms One Woman's View Of Obamacare

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