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Estill sells her cloth and yarn at three separate stores. She hopes to get that number up to nine. Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio

Wade Dooley, in Albion, Iowa, uses less fertilizer than most farmers because he grows rye and alfalfa, along with corn and soybeans. "This field [of rye] has not been fertilized at all," he says. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Does 'Sustainability' Help The Environment Or Just Agriculture's Public Image?

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As the wild oyster population resurges, there is an added bonus — our waterways are getting cleaner. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images

The Oyster's Mighty Comeback Is Creating Cleaner U.S. Waterways

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Rock shrimp from Florida used to be considered too hard-shelled to be worthwhile as commercial seafood. A custom-made machine to crack and split them has made the sweet crustaceans a favorite for Orlando chef Jessica Tantalo, who prepared them as part of Slow Fish 2016 in New Orleans. Eve Troeh for NPR hide caption

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Eve Troeh for NPR

A cover crop of rye grass comes up in a field in eastern Nebraska. Cover crops help hold moisture and nitrogen in the soil. They can reduce nitrate runoff and erosion. Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media
Jordi Elias/Corbis

Congress To Nutritionists: Don't Talk About The Environment

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Carp are collected at a breeding farm near the Belarus village of Ozerny in November 2013. Researchers say there's a lot the aquaculture industry can do to be more efficient. Viktor Drachev/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Viktor Drachev/AFP/Getty Images