Mosul Mosul

More than eight months after the battle ended the government hasn't restored electricity or running water in Mosul's Old City. Hundreds of residents with nowhere else to go have come back to try to live in their damaged houses. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Months After ISIS, Much Of Iraq's Mosul Is Still Rubble

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Sisters Raffal, left, and Farah Khaled are first-year students at Mosul University in Iraq. They're standing outside the university library, which was burned down, along with most of its books, by ISIS when it controlled the city. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Life After ISIS: One Sister Wants To Rebuild. The Other Can't Wait To Leave

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Civil defense workers carrying the body of a civilian retrieved from the rubble of a house destroyed in airstrike. They've collected almost 1,500 bodies so far in west Mosul – many of them women and children – and are still finding casualties. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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More Civilians Than ISIS Fighters Are Believed Killed In Mosul Battle

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Kawkab walks with a social worker in the Dabaga camp for displaced Iraqis. Kawkab says she was seven or eight when she saw ISIS militants shoot her mother dead. "They shot her with an assault rifle," she says. "They shot her and she died and they threw her off the bridge. I asked them, 'Why did you kill her? She's my mother. She didn't do anything.'" Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Traumatized And Vulnerable To Abuse, Orphans From Mosul Are 'Living In Another World'

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A teacher greets students on the first day of elementary school in Mosul, where regular classes have started for the first time since ISIS took over the northern Iraqi city three years ago. Hundreds of schools were damaged or destroyed in the fighting to take back Mosul. Others that have reopened lack books and basic supplies. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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After 3 Years Under ISIS, Mosul's Children Go Back To School

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Bashar Abdul Jabar lost his 15-year-old son, Ahmed, when part of their house collapsed during fighting between Iraqi troops and ISIS. He returned to the city to retrieve his boy's body with the help of civil defense forces. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Ruins are all that remain of the 12th century Great Mosque of al-Nuri, where ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi declared three years ago that an Islamic state was rising again. ISIS blew the mosque up as Iraqi forces advanced. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Airstrikes target Islamic State positions on the edge of the Old City on Tuesday, a day after Iraq's prime minister declared "total victory" in Mosul, Iraq. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Iraqi civilians in Mosul's Old City flash the "victory" sign as they celebrate the government's announcement of the "liberation" of the embattled city Sunday. Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The ravaged Great Mosque of al-Nuri, as seen through rubble in the Old City of Mosul on Thursday. Iraqi forces say they've recaptured the landmark, where ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi declared the group's "caliphate" in 2014. Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Great Mosque of al-Nuri in Mosul, with its tall, leaning al-Hadba minaret, was where ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi declared the group's "caliphate" in Iraq and Syria in July 2014. Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Iraqi forces advance towards Mosul's Old City on Sunday, an offensive to retake the last district in the city still held by the Islamic State. Military commanders say the assault began at dawn after overnight airstrikes by the U.S.-led coalition. Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Iraqis inspect the damage in Mosul's al-Jadida area on March 26, one week after a U.S. airstrike in the same area killed more than 100 civilians. Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pentagon Blames 105 Civilian Deaths From Mosul Strike On 'Secondary Explosion'

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Iraqi civilians evacuated from fighting in Mosul hand their IDs to a member of Iraqi special forces to check if they're on a list of suspected ISIS members. U.S.-backed Iraqi forces have been fighting ISIS in the city for six months and more than 300,000 civilians are still trapped by the fighting. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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As Iraqi Forces Encircle Mosul, ISIS Unleashes New Level Of Brutality On Civilians

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Residents carry the body of several people killed during fights between Iraq security forces and Islamic State on the western side of Mosul, Iraq, yesterday. Residents of the Iraqi city's neighborhood known as Mosul Jidideh at the scene say that scores of residents are believed to have been killed by airstrikes that hit a cluster of homes in the area earlier this month. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Medics tend to an Iraqi counterterrorism fighter injured in a clash with ISIS forces near the village of Bazwaya, on the eastern edge of Mosul. Bulent Kilic /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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No One Was Prepared To Care For So Many Wounded In Mosul

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