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Mahmud, 11, Ayyub, 7, and their mother, Felicia Perkins-Ferreira, walk toward the boat that will take them out of Syria, across the river to Iraq, so they can start their journey home to Trinidad. Ruth Sherlock/NPR hide caption

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Ruth Sherlock/NPR

Trinidadian Mom Reunites With Kids Taken By Their Father To ISIS

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In this Nov. 7, 2018, photo released by the U.S. Army, U.S. soldiers gather for a brief during a combined joint patrol rehearsal in Manbij, Syria. Spc. Zoe Garbarino/U.S. Army via AP hide caption

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Spc. Zoe Garbarino/U.S. Army via AP

A Syrian woman carries an infant Thursday past the ruins of a restaurant in Manbij that was targeted by the Islamic State. Four Americans were killed in the attack. Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images

A security force member walks outside a shuttered restaurant Thursday in Manbij, Syria, the site of a suicide attack that killed more than a dozen people, including four Americans, a day earlier. The Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attack. Delil Souleiman /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Delil Souleiman /AFP/Getty Images

The Pentagon has "begun the process of our deliberate withdrawal from Syria," a military spokesman says. In this photo from Dec. 30, 2018, a line of U.S. military vehicles are seen at a checkpoint in northern Syria. Delil Souleiman /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Delil Souleiman /AFP/Getty Images

Displaced Syrians gather inside a tent in the al-Hol camp in northeastern Syria on Dec. 8. People fled towns where the U.S.-led coalition is fighting the last remnants of ISIS. Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images

'We Were Eating Grass': Syrians Flee As Fight Pushes On Against Last ISIS Remnants

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Brett McGurk, the special presidential envoy to the coalition fighting the Islamic State, announced his resignation days after Secretary of Defense James Mattis also resigned. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo tells NPR that the U.S. remains committed to the Kurds, American allies in the Syrian war, even as the U.S. plans to withdraw troops from the country. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Despite Remaining ISIS Threats, Pompeo Says U.S. Made 'Caliphate In Syria Go Away'

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People walk through Ain Issa, one of the camps that holds displaced Syrians as well as foreign wives of ISIS fighters and their children. Thousands of foreign women and children languish in shelters in northeastern Syria, unwanted by their home governments and with no clear future. Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images

Foreign Wives And Children Of ISIS Are Held In Syria With Uncertain Future

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A member of the Syrian Democratic Forces, backed by U.S. special forces, talks on the radio near Raqqa's stadium as they clear the last positions on the front line on Oct. 16, 2017. The city was an important Islamic State group stronghold. Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images

'This Is Not Liberation': Life In The Rubble Of Raqqa, Syria

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The court in Baghdad where Iraq is trying suspects on terrorism charges. The defendants include more than 500 foreign women married to ISIS fighters. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

ISIS Wives, With Children In Tow, Are Handed Long Jail Sentences Or Death Penalty

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More than eight months after the battle ended the government hasn't restored electricity or running water in Mosul's Old City. Hundreds of residents with nowhere else to go have come back to try to live in their damaged houses. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Months After ISIS, Much Of Iraq's Mosul Is Still Rubble

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Young men outside Raqqa, Syria, training to find and destroy hidden explosive devices left by retreating ISIS forces. Greg Dixon/NPR hide caption

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Greg Dixon/NPR

ISIS' Parting Gift To Its Former Capital: Thousands Of Explosive Booby Traps

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Some of the devastation caused by the fight to remove ISIS from Raqqa, Syria. Greg Dixon/NPR hide caption

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Greg Dixon/NPR

U.S. Military Mission In Syria Endures As ISIS Nears Defeat

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Najla Hussin and her mother at their makeshift home in a village of displaced Yazidis near Dohuk in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Yazidi Women Finally Go To School, Defying Former ISIS Rulers — And Their Own Parents

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Abdirahman Sheik Mohamud is shown in a Columbus, Ohio, courtroom in 2015. He was arrested after traveling to Syria, then returning to Ohio, where he planned to carry out an attack. According to a new report, he's one of 12 Americans who went to join extremist groups in Syria or Iraq, and then returned back to the U.S. Mohamud was sentenced last month to 22 years in prison. Andrew Welsh-Huggins/AP hide caption

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Andrew Welsh-Huggins/AP

Americans In ISIS: Some 300 Tried To Join, 12 Have Returned To U.S.

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A Yazidi tomb in a village in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. Many families were displaced when ISIS killed hundreds of men and kidnapped thousands of women and children. More than 3,000 Yazidis are still missing. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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This Man Has Freed Hundreds Of Yazidis Captured By ISIS. Thousands Remain Missing

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A member of the Afghan local police on patrol in Nangarhar province. U.S. and Afghan forces are currently working to remove ISIS fighters from the area. Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images