ISIS ISIS

Some of the devastation caused by the fight to remove ISIS from Raqqa, Syria. Greg Dixon/NPR hide caption

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Greg Dixon/NPR

U.S. Military Mission In Syria Endures As ISIS Nears Defeat

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Najla Hussin and her mother at their makeshift home in a village of displaced Yazidis near Dohuk in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Yazidi Women Finally Go To School, Defying Former ISIS Rulers — And Their Own Parents

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Abdirahman Sheik Mohamud is shown in a Columbus, Ohio, courtroom in 2015. He was arrested after traveling to Syria, then returning to Ohio, where he planned to carry out an attack. According to a new report, he's one of 12 Americans who went to join extremist groups in Syria or Iraq, and then returned back to the U.S. Mohamud was sentenced last month to 22 years in prison. Andrew Welsh-Huggins/AP hide caption

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Andrew Welsh-Huggins/AP

Americans In ISIS: Some 300 Tried To Join, 12 Have Returned To U.S.

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A Yazidi tomb in a village in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. Many families were displaced when ISIS killed hundreds of men and kidnapped thousands of women and children. More than 3,000 Yazidis are still missing. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

This Man Has Freed Hundreds Of Yazidis Captured By ISIS. Thousands Remain Missing

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A member of the Afghan local police on patrol in Nangarhar province. U.S. and Afghan forces are currently working to remove ISIS fighters from the area. Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images

The Justice Department has charged Zoobia Shahnaz, 27, with bank fraud and money laundering. She allegedly converted money from credit cards into cryptocurrencies including bitcoin and transferred it abroad in support of ISIS. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

A red arrow points to Akayed Ullah, accused of triggering an explosion in the New York City subway system Monday. The image is from surveillance cameras in the commuter tunnel near Times Square; it's part of the federal complaint against Ullah. U.S. Attorney's Office hide caption

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U.S. Attorney's Office

In Iraq, masgouf is part of the national cuisine, but it's getting harder to find as the country still reels from war, sanctions, water quality and economic problems. Sabah Arar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sabah Arar/AFP/Getty Images

Authorities stand near a damaged truck after an attacker drove onto a bike path in New York City, striking and killing eight people Tuesday. The Islamic State has been calling on supporters to use vehicles to carry out attacks for the past year. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

A camp where more than 1,300 women and children, all foreign nationals and believed to be relatives of Islamic State militants, were kept on the outskirts of Mosul. They have been moved by Iraqi officials, to the concern of aid agencies. Balint Szlanko/AP hide caption

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Balint Szlanko/AP

Airstrikes target Islamic State positions on the edge of the Old City on Tuesday, a day after Iraq's prime minister declared "total victory" in Mosul, Iraq. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

The Great Mosque of al-Nuri in Mosul, with its tall, leaning al-Hadba minaret, was where ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi declared the group's "caliphate" in Iraq and Syria in July 2014. Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images

Iraqis inspect the damage in Mosul's al-Jadida area on March 26, one week after a U.S. airstrike in the same area killed more than 100 civilians. Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images

Pentagon Blames 105 Civilian Deaths From Mosul Strike On 'Secondary Explosion'

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A defaced Islamic State flag is emblazoned on a wall in Tikrit, Iraq, in 2015. ISIS will generally claim responsibility for an attack within one day, though it can sometimes take longer. Mohammed Sawaf/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammed Sawaf/AFP/Getty Images

What Does It Mean When ISIS Claims Responsibility For An Attack?

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A pilot prepares to launch an unmanned aerial vehicle from a ground control station earlier this year. The Air Force is moving to treat psychological stress faced by remote pilots and analysts a little more like the effects of traditional warfare. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

The Warfare May Be Remote But The Trauma Is Real

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