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Jeelan, 11, the day after being rescued from an ISIS family who had held her captive for the past two years. She says she doesn't remember her Yazidi family. "I want to go back to Um Ali," she says, referring to the Iraqi woman who had been pretending to be her mother in a detention camp for ISIS families. "Um Ali is my real family." Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

'I Want To Go Back': The Yazidi Girls Who Did Not Want To Be Rescued From ISIS

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Danisch Farooqi with his daughter, Aaliya, in Hamburg, Germany, when she was around 2 years old. "I haven't seen her in five years," he says. He wonders if she has forgotten him. Courtesy of Danisch Farooqi hide caption

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Courtesy of Danisch Farooqi

'I Would Do Anything For Her': A German Dad's Search For His Daughter, Taken By ISIS

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The skeletal remains of a mosque stand amid overgrown shrubs. Authorities say 25 mosques were destroyed in the district most affected by the five months of fighting between government forces and ISIS militants in Marawi. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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Julie McCarthy/NPR

The Philippines' Marawi City Remains Wrecked Nearly 2 Years After ISIS War

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Caregiver Fajriya Khaled holds a child at an orphanage in northeastern Syria, home to 41 children of Yazidi mothers and ISIS fathers. The Yazidi community in Iraq forces the women to leave their children behind if they want to return home. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

In Syria, An Orphanage Cares For Children Born To Yazidi Mothers Enslaved By ISIS

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The People's Defense Court in the Rojava district of northeast Syria. Judges here have been holding trials of thousands of ISIS fighters. The Kurdish-led region broke from Syrian government control in 2012 and has developed its own justice system that it says adheres to Western standards of human rights. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

'Revenge Is For The Weak': Kurdish Courts In Northeastern Syria Take On ISIS Cases

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Bindu Sampath, 52, shows photos of her daughter Nimisha Sampath, now 29, who left India three years ago, after converting to Islam. She and her husband, a fellow Muslim convert, are wanted by Indian authorities for allegedly joining ISIS. They're believed to be in Afghanistan. "Only a mother can know how I am sacrificing," says Sampath." I say, 'God, please help her, please hold her.'" Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

'God, Please Help Her': Indian Parents Agonize Over Radicalization Of Their Children

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Women sit on the floor as they wait in a clinic at the al-Hol detention camp. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Misery Grows At Syrian Camp Holding ISIS Family Members

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Ibrahim, 2, in northeastern Syria a few hours after his freed Yazidi mother returned to Iraq without him. Ibrahim's father was an ISIS fighter. Although his mother wanted to take him home, the Yazidis do not allow children of ISIS fathers to live with the community. Iraqi law considers the children Muslim rather than Yazidi. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Freed From ISIS, Yazidi Mothers Face Wrenching Choice: Abandon Kids Or Never Go Home

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This image made from video posted on a militant website on April 29 purports to show ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, being interviewed by his group's Al-Furqan media outlet. Al-Furqan media via AP hide caption

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Al-Furqan media via AP

Women carry children near the al-Hol camp in Syria's Kurdish-majority region of Rojava. The camp is filled with more than 72,000 people — most of them women and children who came out of the last ISIS-held territory. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

'We Pray For The Caliphate To Return': ISIS Families Crowd Into Syrian Camps

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Fighters with the U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces hold a position on a hilltop overlooking the last ISIS enclave in the village of Baghouz. Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images

Mazen (right), 13, and his brother Mezban in a camp for displaced Yazidis in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. Mazen was freed recently, five years after being kidnapped by ISIS. He was found in Baghouz, the last ISIS stronghold in Syria. His brother was also kidnapped and, 2-1/2 years ago, was rescued with their mother. The boys' father is still missing. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Freed From ISIS, Few Yazidis Return To Suffering Families, Many Remain Missing

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Shamima Begum was stripped of her citizenship last month but her child, a boy, was still considered a British national. However, the government argued it was too dangerous to try to retrieve the newborn from the sprawling refugee camp where the pair lived. Metropolitan Police/AP hide caption

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Metropolitan Police/AP

Hassan Shibly, attorney for the family of Hoda Muthana, says she was a "vulnerable young woman who was brainwashed and manipulated." Chris O'Meara/AP hide caption

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Chris O'Meara/AP

Veiled women reportedly associated with ISIS walk under the supervision of a female fighter from the Syrian Democratic Forces in northeastern Syria on Sunday. Over the weekend, President Trump demanded European allies repatriate their citizens captured as ISIS fighters. Bulent Kilic /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bulent Kilic /AFP/Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell led the effort to advance an amendment that supports keeping U.S. troops in Syria and Afghanistan to fight ISIS and al-Qaida. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Senate Republicans Rebuke President On Syria And Afghanistan Policy

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Mahmud, 11, Ayyub, 7, and their mother, Felicia Perkins-Ferreira, walk toward the boat that will take them out of Syria, across the river to Iraq, so they can start their journey home to Trinidad. Ruth Sherlock/NPR hide caption

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Ruth Sherlock/NPR

Trinidadian Mom Reunites With Kids Taken By Their Father To ISIS

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In this Nov. 7, 2018, photo released by the U.S. Army, U.S. soldiers gather for a brief during a combined joint patrol rehearsal in Manbij, Syria. Spc. Zoe Garbarino/U.S. Army via AP hide caption

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Spc. Zoe Garbarino/U.S. Army via AP

A Syrian woman carries an infant Thursday past the ruins of a restaurant in Manbij that was targeted by the Islamic State. Four Americans were killed in the attack. Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images