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Individuals from all walks of life join together at Silent Book Clubs around the world to socialize, meet new people and trade book recommendations. When the bell rings, it's reading time, and people can read whatever they like, as long as it's in silence. Jonathan McHugh/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Jonathan McHugh/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Giving dads a task — in this case, reading — seemed to suit them better than the kind of parenting classes favored by moms. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Maskot/Getty Images

Jozef Jason, 7, reads a book to Ryan Griffin at the Fuller Cut in Ypsilanti, Mich., as part of the barbershop's literacy program. Keith Jason/Courtesy of Keith Jason hide caption

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Keith Jason/Courtesy of Keith Jason

Choose A Book And Read To Your Barber, He'll Take A Little Money Off The Top

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This scraggly 50-foot Christmas tree in downtown Reading, Pa., became a symbol for a town hit by tough economic times to rally behind. Ben Allen/WITF hide caption

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Ben Allen/WITF

It Just Needed A Little Love: An Ugly Spruce Ties A Town Together

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Fourth-grader Isiah Soto digests some history during independent reading time. Emily Hanford/American Public Media hide caption

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Emily Hanford/American Public Media

Common Core Reading: 'The New Colossus'

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