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On Thursday ICE officials confirmed at least six immigrant detainees on a hunger strike are being force-fed through a nasal tube. Salwan Georges/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Salwan Georges/The Washington Post/Getty Images

An asylum-seeking boy from Central America runs down a hallway in December after arriving at a shelter in San Diego. Immigrant advocates say they are suing the U.S. government for allegedly detaining immigrant children too long and improperly refusing to release them to relatives. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Lawsuits Allege 'Grave Harm' To Immigrant Children In Detention

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Families eat dinner at Holy Family Church in El Paso. Immigration officials have been releasing hundreds of asylum-seeking migrants into border communities. Churches and shelters are standing by to help. Mallory Falk/KRWG hide caption

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Mallory Falk/KRWG

Along The Southwest Border, Shelters and Churches Scramble To House Migrant Families

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Protesters march through Midtown Manhattan on Monday as they rally against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Is 8 Enough? The Consequences Of The Supreme Court Starting 1 Justice Short

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President Trump, Vice President Pence and first lady Melania Trump visit the Federal Emergency Management Agency headquarters in Washington, D.C., on June 6. Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen and FEMA Administrator Brock Long are seated at right. This summer, DHS transferred nearly $10 million from FEMA to immigration authorities, according to a congressional document. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Sea ice is seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft off the northwest coast of Greenland on March 30, 2017. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Some Of The Oldest Ice In The Arctic Is Now Breaking Apart

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Philadelphia is ending a controversial data-sharing contract with Immigration and Customs Enforcement. In recent weeks, protesters have gathered at City Hall to call for the reunification of families separated by the Trump administration's zero-tolerance policy and the abolition of ICE. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Philadelphia Is Ending A Major Contract With ICE

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First lady Melania Trump talks with Border Patrol agents as she visits a processing center of a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility in Tucson, Ariz. Thursday. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

An old man prays inside Sultan Ahmed mosque in Istanbul, Turkey. Daniel Candal/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Candal/Getty Images

Mosques Consider Sanctuary For Immigrants

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In a "botched" investigation, Immigrations and Customs Enforcement kept Davino Watson, a U.S. citizen, imprisoned as a deportable alien for nearly 3 1/2 years. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Officer Jesus Robles (at right) and Officer Jason Cisneroz, community service officers in the Houston Police Department, have noticed that fewer unauthorized Latinos step forward to report crimes out of fear of deportation. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

New Immigration Crackdowns Creating 'Chilling Effect' On Crime Reporting

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Protesters march during a May Day demonstration outside of a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) office on May 1, 2017 in San Francisco, California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Fatima Avelica, 13, daughter of of Romulo Avelica-Gonzalez, attends a rally with loved ones and supporters for his release outside U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) offices on March 13, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Foreign nationals being arrested Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017, during a targeted enforcement operation conducted by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) aimed at immigration fugitives, re-entrants and at-large criminal aliens in Los Angeles. Charles Reed/AP hide caption

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Charles Reed/AP