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U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke speaks during a campaign rally in Plano, Texas, on Saturday. O'Rourke is the Democratic challenger for the Senate seat currently held by Senator Ted Cruz, R-Texas. Laura Buckman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Laura Buckman/AFP/Getty Images

The Biggest Hurdle For Beto O'Rourke In Texas Is Turning Out Latino Voters

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Maryland Senate President Mike Miller (left) and House Speaker Michael Busch discuss an FBI briefing they received about Russian links to a company that maintains part of the state's voter registration platform during a news conference in Annapolis, Md. Brian Witte/AP hide caption

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Brian Witte/AP

A federal judge says that Kansas' strict voter registration law is unconstitutional — and she also criticized Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who represented his office in defending the law. Mitchell Willetts/AP hide caption

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Mitchell Willetts/AP

The March For Our Lives movement is hitting the road this summer to register young people to vote ahead of the November mid-term elections. Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images

Parkland Survivors Launch Tour To Register Young Voters And Get Them Out In November

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A view of a ballot scanner at a New York City Board of Elections voting machine facility warehouse just before last November's election. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

State And Local Officials Wary Of Federal Government's Election Security Efforts

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Maryjane Medina, 18, a first time voter, walks up to polling booth to cast her vote at a polling station set-up in Los Angeles, California. Irfan Khan/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Irfan Khan/LA Times via Getty Images

Demonstrators march through the streets of Winston-Salem, N.C., in July 2015, after the beginning of a federal voting rights trial challenging a 2013 state law. The most controversial part of that law — requiring voters to show photo identification at the polls — goes into effect this week, although its language was softened slightly last summer. Chuck Burton/AP hide caption

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Chuck Burton/AP

New Year, New Laws: States Diverge On Gun Rights, Voting Restrictions

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California Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law the state's "motor voter" law in hopes of boosting turnout in future elections. The state had 42 percent turnout in the 2014 midterms, a record low. Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP hide caption

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Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP

California Becomes 2nd State To Automatically Register Voters

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Oregon Gov. Kate Brown smiles after signing an automatic voter registration bill on Monday in Salem, Ore. Seventeen years after Oregon decided to become the first state in the nation to hold all elections by mail ballot, it is taking another pioneering step to encourage more people to cast ballots, by automatically registering them to vote. Don Ryan/AP hide caption

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Don Ryan/AP

Voters crowd into their polling place Aug. 15 at Keonepoko Elementary School in Pahoa, Hawaii. Marco Garcia/AP hide caption

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Marco Garcia/AP

On The Fall Docket: Who Gets To Vote — And Who Gets To Decide?

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