Islamic State Islamic State

This particular Mosul orphanage holds 18 children under the age of 6, some of them the abandoned children of Yazidi women kidnapped by Islamic State fighters. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Kidnapped, Abandoned Children Turn Up At Mosul Orphanage As ISIS Battle Ends

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On Saturday a federal judge ruled an American detainee, held for three months in Iraq by the U.S. military without charge, has the right to counsel. In this 2008 photo, detainees are seen through the door of their cell at the U.S. detention facility at Camp Cropper in Baghdad, Iraq. Maya Alleruzzo/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Maya Alleruzzo/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Civil defense workers carrying the body of a civilian retrieved from the rubble of a house destroyed in airstrike. They've collected almost 1,500 bodies so far in west Mosul – many of them women and children – and are still finding casualties. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

More Civilians Than ISIS Fighters Are Believed Killed In Mosul Battle

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Security forces guard the site of a clash between gunmen and security forces in Kabul on Monday. Gunmen stormed a partially constructed building near an intelligence training center, triggering a gun battle with security forces as detonations and shooting reverberated from the area. Massoud Hossaini/AP hide caption

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Massoud Hossaini/AP

Thousands of Iraqi soldiers in Baghdad take part in a training exercise in 2015. On Saturday, the Iraqi prime minister announced its war on the Islamic State group was over, after more than three years of fighting. ALI AL-SAADI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ALI AL-SAADI/AFP/Getty Images

American-backed forces took control of the Islamic State's de facto capital of Raqqa, Syria, last month, dealing a major blow to the extremist organization. Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images

A teacher greets students on the first day of elementary school in Mosul, where regular classes have started for the first time since ISIS took over the northern Iraqi city three years ago. Hundreds of schools were damaged or destroyed in the fighting to take back Mosul. Others that have reopened lack books and basic supplies. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

After 3 Years Under ISIS, Mosul's Children Go Back To School

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Displaced Syrians head to refugee camps on the outskirts of Raqqa on Sunday. Syrian fighters, backed by the U.S., have been driving out the Islamic State. However, many civilians are fleeing the fighting, and there's still no sign of a political settlement in Syria on the horizon. Bulent Kilic /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bulent Kilic /AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. Is Beating Back ISIS, So What Comes Next?

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Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, purportedly seen here in video posted in 2014, had not been heard publicly for nearly a year — until Thursday, when ISIS released a possible audio recording of Baghdadi. AP hide caption

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AP

Smoke rises from buildings in the area of Bughayliyah, on the northern outskirts of Deir ez-Zor on Sept. 13, as Syrian forces advance during their ongoing battle against ISIS. George Ourfalian/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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George Ourfalian/AFP/Getty Images

A Syrian girl walks through an empty, ruined house in Raqqa earlier this month. Many civilians like her have no choice but to stay in the war-ravaged city despite the danger, either because they've been trapped by ISIS fighters or because they don't have the money to pay smugglers. Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images

Iraqi civilians in Mosul's Old City flash the "victory" sign as they celebrate the government's announcement of the "liberation" of the embattled city Sunday. Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images

Iraqi government forces flash a victory sign while holding an upside-down Islamic State flag in western Mosul on June 9. As ISIS loses territory, it's still exhorting its supporters to keep fighting. Mohamed El-Shahed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohamed El-Shahed/AFP/Getty Images

As ISIS Gets Squeezed In Syria And Iraq, It's Using Music As A Weapon

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Iraqi forces advance towards Mosul's Old City on Sunday, an offensive to retake the last district in the city still held by the Islamic State. Military commanders say the assault began at dawn after overnight airstrikes by the U.S.-led coalition. Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images

Men in military uniform stand at a window in the Iranian Parliament building following an attack on Wednesday in Tehran. More than a dozen people were killed and many more wounded during twin gun and suicide bomb attacks in Iran's capital. Majid Saeedi/Getty Images hide caption

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Majid Saeedi/Getty Images

Philippine army Scout Rangers crouch in a classroom during a mission to flush out militant snipers in Marawi on Tuesday. Using these snipers, human shields and their knowledge of the city, the ISIS-linked militants have continued to maintain their grasp on parts of the city. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

Security forces inspect the site of a massive explosion in a busy area not far from the German Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Wednesday. Rahmat Gul/AP hide caption

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Rahmat Gul/AP

Kabul Truck Bomb Kills At Least 80 People, Injures Hundreds More

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