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The long economic recovery has brought unemployment to historic lows. But the number of men in the labor force during their prime working age has dropped significantly over the past 50 years. Jetta Productions Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Jetta Productions Inc./Getty Images

Despite Job Boom, More Men Are Giving Up On Work

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Gaby Gemetti decided to leave the workforce after having her second child. In March she started a "returnship," a new type of program to recruit and retrain women like her who are looking to resume their careers. Here, Gaby and John Gemetti are seen with their children, Carlo and Gianna. Courtesy of Shannon Wight Photography hide caption

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Courtesy of Shannon Wight Photography

Hot Job Market Is Wooing Women Into Workforce Faster Than Men

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Betty Fernandez of Macy's department store speaks with a potential applicant about job openings during a job fair in Miami on April 5. Employers added far more jobs than expected in April — another sign the U.S. economy is chugging along as the expansion nears the 10-year mark. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Unemployment Drops To 3.6%, 263,000 Jobs Added, Showing Economy Remains Strong

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An arrangement of pills of the opioid oxycodone-acetaminophen, also known as Percocet, in New York. A new report finds a link between workforce participation and the prescription rate of opioids in the U.S. Patrick Sison/AP hide caption

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Patrick Sison/AP

An employee moves cement blocks at the Cement Products Manufacturing Co. facility in Redmond, Ore. Millions of men in their prime working years have dropped out of the labor force since the 1960s. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

An Economic Mystery: Why Are Men Leaving The Workforce?

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Aetna announced one of its largest pay hikes recently. CEO Mark Bertolini says he believes it largely could pay for itself by making workers more productive. Courtesy of Aetna hide caption

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Courtesy of Aetna

Health Insurer Aetna Raises Wages For Lowest-Paid Workers To $16 An Hour

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McDonald's announced this week that it will pay workers in its company-owned stores $1 more per hour than the local minimum wage. Wal-Mart, Target and the parent company of Marshalls and TJ Maxx have also promised to boost wages for their lowest-paid workers this year. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov

While Pay Holds Steady For Most, Low-Wage Workers Get A Boost

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It was a great time to be an American man in the workplace after World War II. Hiring was strong for both white-collar jobs and factory work while industries like autos, aviation and steel were booming. By the 1960s, that started to change. Three Lions/Getty Images hide caption

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Three Lions/Getty Images

Why Are Men Leaving The American Workforce?

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