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Abner Stolztfus owns Cedar Dream dairy farm in Peach Bottom, Pa. Last year, Stolztfus decided to invest almost $200,000 in equipment and learned how to make yogurt from scratch. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

Cavitation produces a bubble that rapidly collapses and becomes hotter than the sun's surface. The mantis shrimp uses it, and now so do food and drink firms, to improve flavors — from yogurt to beer. Reinhard Dirscherl/ullstein bild via Getty Images hide caption

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Reinhard Dirscherl/ullstein bild via Getty Images

It's not just kombucha and yogurt: Probiotics are now showing up in dozens of packaged foods. But what exactly do these designer foods with friendly flora actually offer — besides a high price tag? Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

At the Iowa State University Beef Nutrition Farm, the cattle eat carefully formulated rations. Researchers there are trying to test new types of animal feed. Amy Mayer/Iowa Public Radio hide caption

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Amy Mayer/Iowa Public Radio

Beyond the fruit-sweetened stuff: Around the world, cooks turn to yogurt for a huge variety of culinary delights. From left: cast-iron chicken marinated in a yogurt-spice blend and topped with the Middle Eastern grain freekeh; a Persian cold yogurt soup; shitake frittata with labneh, kale and shallots. From Yogurt Culture by Cheryl Sternman Rule Ellen Silverman/Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt hide caption

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Ellen Silverman/Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Everything Bagel: This yogurt from Sohha Savory Yogurt comes topped with roasted pine nuts, poppy seeds, sesame seeds, garlic, onion and extra virgin olive oil. Christina Holmes/Courtesy of Sohha Savory Yogurt hide caption

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Christina Holmes/Courtesy of Sohha Savory Yogurt

Sugar Hooked Us On Yogurt. Could Savory Be The New Sweet?

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A depiction of meal with cheese from Tacuinum Sanitatis, a medieval handbook on health and well-being based on the Taqwim al‑sihha, an 11th-century Arab medical treatise. via Wikimedia hide caption

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via Wikimedia

Historic yogurt-making cultures held by Mirjana Curic-Bawden. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Hey Yogurt-Maker, Where'd You Get Those Microbes?

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Scientists have documented that beneficial microorganisms play a critical role in how our bodies function. And it's becoming clear that the influence goes beyond the gut — researchers are turning their attention to our emotional health. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Prozac In The Yogurt Aisle: Can 'Good' Bacteria Chill Us Out?

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Adolfo Valle for NPR

A Crime Of Passion: When The Love Of Yogurt Burned Too Bright

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This hazelnut-chocolate spread looks like the iconic Nutella, but it tastes more richly of hazelnuts, says Chris Kimball. Anthony Tieuli/America's Test Kitchen hide caption

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Anthony Tieuli/America's Test Kitchen

With Help From America's Test Kitchen, Why Buy When You Can DIY?

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