Central America Central America

Panamanian Foreign Minister Isabel de Saint Malo de Alvarado and Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi toast after signing a joint statement on establishing diplomatic relations in June 2017 in Beijing. Greg Baler/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baler/Pool/Getty Images

China Lures Taiwan's Latin American Allies

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Archbishop Óscar Romero stands outside the chapel of the Hospital de la Divina Providencia in San Salvador on Nov. 20, 1979. Alex Bowie/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Bowie/Getty Images

A 'Voice For The Voiceless': Sainthood For El Salvador's Archbishop Óscar Romero

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Anti-government demonstrators protest in Granada, Nicaragua. Hundreds of people have been killed in the government's brutal suppression of protests that erupted in April. Alfredo Zuniga/AP hide caption

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Alfredo Zuniga/AP

Nicaraguan refugees fleeing their country due to unrest sleep in a Christian church in San José, Costa Rica, on July 28. Juan Carlos Ulate/Reuters hide caption

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Juan Carlos Ulate/Reuters

200 Nicaraguans Claim Asylum Daily In Costa Rica, Fleeing Violent Unrest

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The train known as "The Beast" passes by the Sagrada Familia shelter in Apizaco, Mexico. For many migrants, the train is the next step in their journey north. Alejandro Cegarra for NPR hide caption

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Alejandro Cegarra for NPR

Migrants Are Stuck In Mexico With Violence Back Home And 'Zero Tolerance' In The U.S.

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Detained immigrant children line up in the cafeteria at the Karnes County Residential Center, in Texas. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Trump Administration And Advocates Clash Over What's Next For Migrant Children

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Migrants and day laborers cross the Suchiate River, which divides Mexico and Guatemala. The crossing happens despite immigration officials working on the bridge above. James Frederick for NPR hide caption

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James Frederick for NPR

Mexico Deploys A Formidable Deportation Force Near Its Own Southern Border

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Julio Calderon, 28, an undocumented immigrant from Honduras, listens after speaking in favor of renewing temporary protected status for immigrants from Central America and Haiti now living in the United States, during a news conference Monday, Nov. 6, 2017, in Miami. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

A woman builds a fire at a migrant camp on the Costa Rica-Panama border. The area has seen a recent surge of migrants coming from Africa, hoping to make it to the U.S. Rolando Arrieta/NPR hide caption

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Rolando Arrieta/NPR

Via Cargo Ships and Jungle Treks, Africans Dream Of Reaching The U.S.

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Immigrants from El Salvador, including one who says she is seven months pregnant, stand next to a U.S. Border Patrol truck after they turned themselves in to border agents on Dec. 7, 2015, near Rio Grande City, Texas. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

U.S.-Mexico Border Sees Resurgence Of Central Americans Seeking Asylum

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Shelter actors (left to right) Emilio Garcia Sanchez, Peter Mark, Jonathan Bangs, Cynthia Callejas, Jazmen-Bleu Gutierrez, Andres Velez and Moriah Martel. Steven Gunther hide caption

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Steven Gunther

Child Migrants' Harrowing Journey Brought To Life On Stage

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An adult immigrant from El Salvador who entered the country illegally wears an ankle monitor July 27 at a shelter in San Antonio. Lawyers representing immigrant mothers held in a South Texas detention center say the women have been denied counsel and coerced into accepting ankle-monitoring bracelets as a condition of release, even after judges made clear that paying their bonds would suffice. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

As Asylum Seekers Swap Prison Beds For Ankle Bracelets, Same Firm Profits

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Boys wait in line to make a phone call at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Nogales Placement Center in Arizona in June. Many of the minors who arrived from Central America last year are now awaiting court hearings to determine if they can stay in the U.S. Ross D. Franklin/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/Pool/Getty Images

Many Unaccompanied Minors No Longer Alone, But Still In Limbo

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Wilfredo Díaz left Honduras 16 years ago before his third child was born, and he hopes to bring his children to the U.S. under the State Department's new program. Alexandra Starr hide caption

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Alexandra Starr

New Entry Program Reunites Some Immigrants With Their Children

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A worker dries coffee beans at a coffee plantation in Santiago Atitlan, Guatemala, in February 2013. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

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Moises Castillo/AP

Rust Devastates Guatemala's Prime Coffee Crop And Its Farmers

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President of Honduras Juan Orlando Hernandez, left, delivers remarks on immigration beside President of Guatemala Otto Perez Molina. Michael Reynolds/EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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Michael Reynolds/EPA /LANDOV