teens teens

In a study of nearly 5,600 U.S. youths ages 12 to 17, about 6 percent say they've engaged in some sort of digital self-harm. More than half in that subgroup say they've bullied themselves this way more than once. Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images

In both urban and rural areas, about 40 percent of women surveyed were currently married to a member of the opposite sex. Only about 30 percent of the rural women of childbearing age had no children, versus roughly 41 percent of urban women. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

The study drew on survey data from half a million U.S. teenagers from 2010 to 2015. martin-dm/Getty Images hide caption

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martin-dm/Getty Images

Increased Hours Online Correlate With An Uptick In Teen Depression, Suicidal Thoughts

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The teen protagonist in John Green's latest novel, Turtles All The Way Down, has a type of anxiety disorder that sends her into fearful "thought spirals" of bacterial infection and death. Jennifer Kerrigan hide caption

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Jennifer Kerrigan

For Novelist John Green, OCD Is Like An 'Invasive Weed' Inside His Mind

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Sleep Scientist Warns Against Walking Through Life 'In An Underslept State'

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Psychologist Jean Twenge says smartphones have brought about dramatic shifts in behavior among the generation of children who grew up with the devices. Image Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Image Source/Getty Images

How Smartphones Are Making Kids Unhappy

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Vials of the HPV vaccination drug Gardasil. Doctors and public health experts say the new version of the vaccine could protect more people against cancer. Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images

A child takes a facial recognition test in which he is asked to match the face on the top to one of the faces on the bottom. Jesse Gomez and Kalanit Grill-Spector at the Vision and Perception Neuroscience Lab/Science hide caption

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Jesse Gomez and Kalanit Grill-Spector at the Vision and Perception Neuroscience Lab/Science

Brain Area That Recognizes Faces Gets Busier And Better In Young Adults

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The Benicia Compliments page sprang up on Instagram as a platform for girls attending Benicia High School to tag each other in positive social media posts. Shawn Wen/Youth Radio hide caption

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Shawn Wen/Youth Radio

Teen Girls Flip The Negative Script On Social Media

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Kids and teens should get two to three quarts of water per day, via food or drink, research suggests. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Got Water? Most Kids, Teens Don't Drink Enough

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José Moncada, 16, signed up for a summer youth employment program in New York City. He said hopes to earn enough to help his family, which lives on less than $30,000 a year. Kaomi Goetz for NPR hide caption

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Kaomi Goetz for NPR

Teens Hoping For More Jobs, Higher Wages This Summer

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About one-third of black and Hispanic teens say they're online just about all the time, compared with about 1 in 5 whites, a new study says. 27 Studios/Getty Images hide caption

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27 Studios/Getty Images

ISIS Used Predatory Tools And Tactics To Convince U.S. Teens To Join

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This human-scale lab rat cage is parked near a skate park in Denver, Colo., to make a point about the lack of science on marijuana. Richard Feldman Studio/Sukle Advertising and Design hide caption

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Richard Feldman Studio/Sukle Advertising and Design