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In La Paz, a low-income neighborhood on the outskirts of Santa Marta, Colombia, water service from the local utility can be erratic or nonexistent. Pictured: Neighborhood kids stand next to a rain barrel positioned under a corrugated roof. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

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Ben de la Cruz/NPR

Sibley Street, along with other residential roads were closed due to flooding from recent rain storms resulting in high water levels in Willow Creek, in Folsom, California. Kenneth James/California Department of Water Resources hide caption

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Kenneth James/California Department of Water Resources

California's flooding reveals we're still building cities for the climate of the past

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Most reservoirs aren't allowed to fill up in the winter, but Folsom Reservoir outside of Sacramento, California is using a new strategy to save more water by using weather forecasts. Ken James/California Department of Water Resources hide caption

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Ken James/California Department of Water Resources

Heavy rain is still hitting California. A few reservoirs figured out how to capture more for drought

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Residents of Mykolaiv collect clean water from a distribution station set up by the International Committee of the Red Cross on Oct. 1. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Warmer temperatures are leading to emptier reservoirs across the West, such as Lake Oroville in Northern California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Flint, Mich., Mayor Karen Weaver recommended on Tuesday that the city use Detroit's water supply long-term. Flint was using Detroit water before switching to its own system in 2014 to save money. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

A government watchdog's report says Flint residents' exposure to lead in city drinking water could have been stopped months earlier by federal regulators. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Lead in the drinking water in Flint, Mich., has caused a massive public health crisis and prompted President Obama to declare a federal state of emergency there. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Educators In Flint Step Up Efforts To Reach Youngest Victims Of Tainted Water

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A steamboat drifts along the Mississippi River in New Orleans. A group called America's Watershed Initiative says "funding for infrastructure maintenance means that multiple failures may be imminent" for the lower Mississippi River basin. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

After teens noticed a change in the tap water in Oakland due to the California drought, 17-year-old Amber Lee took a tap vs. bottled water taste test in Youth Radio's studios. Jenny Bolario/Youth Radio hide caption

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Jenny Bolario/Youth Radio

Teens Say California Drought Makes Tap Water Taste Funky

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The California Aqueduct carries water from the Sierra Nevada Mountains to Southern California. It is one of four aqueducts in the region that glide across the San Andreas Fault. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Southern California's Water Supply Threatened By Next Major Quake

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The UCLA campus was flooded last week after a 30-inch water main broke. The city of Los Angeles is on a 300-year replacement plan for its water system. Mike Meadows/AP hide caption

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Mike Meadows/AP

If A Water Main Isn't Broke, Don't Fix It (For 300 Years?)

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