sewage sewage

Tourists walk along a beach in Malay town, on the Philippine island Boracay, last week. President Duterte's decision to close Boracay has rocked the island. The Philippines is set to deploy hundreds of riot police to keep travelers out and head off potential protests before its six-month closure to tourists. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

As Philippines Shuts Down A Popular Tourist Island, Residents Fear For Their Future

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University of Puget Sound chemist Dan Burgard keeps a freezer full of archived samples from two wastewater treatment plants in western Washington in case he needs to rerun the samples or analyze a specific drug he didn't test for the first time. Dan Burgard hide caption

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Dan Burgard

After the 2010 earthquake, NGOs dumped hundreds of thousands of gallons of raw sewage at the end of the Port-au-Prince city landfill, which borders the sea and is not lined with an impermeable material. Marie Arago for NPR hide caption

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Marie Arago for NPR

You Probably Don't Want To Know About Haiti's Sewage Problems

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Farmer Efi Cohen inspects almond trees on a kibbutz south of Jerusalem. The Israeli government says it's safe to use treated sewage water to irrigate tree fruit, but not all crops. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

Israel Bets On Recycled Water To Meet Its Growing Thirst

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Bob Dobrogowski and his daughter Rosie look at the collapsed basement of his parents' home during July 2010 flooding in Milwaukee. Michael Sears/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Michael Sears/MCT/Landov

Paul Herringshaw says farmers like him have been taking steps to reduce crop runoff for years. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN

Lake Erie's Toxic Bloom Has Ohio Farmers On The Defensive

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