experimental drugs experimental drugs
Stories About

experimental drugs

The Food and Drug Administration approves more than 99 percent of applications for compassionate use of experimental medicines. But supporters of a right-to-try law want a more direct approach. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP

A well-regarded intensive care doctor in Virginia says he has had good success in treating 150 sepsis patients with a mix of IV corticosteroids, vitamin C and vitamin B, along with careful management of fluids. Other doctors want more proof — the sort that comes only via more rigorous tests. Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Why The Newly Proposed Sepsis Treatment Needs More Study

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/521918863/522091724" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

ALS patients and their families rallied for expanded access to experimental drugs in Washington, D.C. on May 11, 2015. Courtesy of Lina Clark hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Lina Clark

Patients Demand The 'Right To Try' Experimental Drugs, But Costs Can Be Steep

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/517796956/518391679" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Research with living systems is never simple, scientists say, so there are many possible sources of variation in any experiment, ranging from the animals and cells to the details of lab technique. Tom Werner/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tom Werner/Getty Images

What Does It Mean When Cancer Findings Can't Be Reproduced?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/510304871/510534024" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Glenn Lightner in 2012 at age 13. His father searched clinicaltrials.gov for years, to no avail, hoping to find a promising experimental cancer treatment that might save his son's life. Courtesy of Lawrence Lightner hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Lawrence Lightner

Results Of Many Clinical Trials Not Being Reported

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/392355433/392375506" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Medical workers will test the effectiveness of three new potential Ebola therapies at clinics run by the nongovernmental organization Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders). Zoom Dosso/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Zoom Dosso/AFP/Getty Images

3 Potential Ebola Therapies To Be Tested; Liberia Lifts Emergency

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/363741032/363746642" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Dr. Gabriel Logan is one of two doctors at the Bomi county hospital, which serves a county of 85,000 people. In a desperate attempt to save Ebola patients, he started experimenting with an HIV drug to treat them. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
John W. Poole/NPR

A Liberian Doctor Comes Up With His Own Ebola Regimen

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/355164328/355187996" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Miguel Pajares, a Spanish priest who was infected with the Ebola virus while working in Liberia, is transferred from a plane to an ambulance after arriving in Spain. He was treated with an experimental drug but died on the disease. Spanish Defense Ministry/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Spanish Defense Ministry/AP