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French soldiers assist mostly French nationals in a bus waiting to be airlifted back to France on a French military aircraft, at the international Airport in Niamey, Niger, Tuesday, Aug. 1, 2023. Sam Mednick/AP hide caption

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Sam Mednick/AP

Nigeriens participate in a march called by supporters of coup leader Gen. Abdourahmane Tchiani in Niamey, Niger, Sunday, July 30, 2023. Days after mutinous soldiers ousted Niger's democratically elected president, uncertainty is mounting about the country's future and some are calling out the junta's reasons for seizing control. The sign reads: "Down with France, long live Putin." Sam Mednick/AP hide caption

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Sam Mednick/AP

Supporters of the Nigerien defence and security forces gather during a demonstration outside the national assembly in Niamey on July 27, 2023. -/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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-/AFP via Getty Images

A look at what's next for Niger a day after the coup

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A general view of billowing smoke as supporters of Niger's defense and security forces attack the headquarters of the Nigerien Party for Democracy and Socialism, the party of overthrown President Mohamed Bazoum, in Niamey, Thursday. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Here's why Niger's coup matters to the U.S.

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Supporters of the Nigerien defence and security forces gather during a demonstration outside the national assembly in Niamey on July 27, 2023. The head of Niger's armed forces on July 27, 2023 said he endorsed a declaration by troops who overnight announced they had taken power after detaining the country's elected president, Mohamed Bazoum. -/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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-/AFP via Getty Images

Niger's military announces coup

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Col. Major Amadou Abdramane, center, is shown speaking during a televised statement. Soldiers claimed on July 26, 2023, to have overthrown the government of Niger President Mohamed Bazoum in a statement read out on national television. -/ORTN - Télé Sahel/AFP via Getty hide caption

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-/ORTN - Télé Sahel/AFP via Getty

President of Niger Mohamed Bazoum delivers a speech at a financial summit in Paris, June 22. On Wednesday, he said members of the presidential guard tried to move against him. Ludovic Marin/AP hide caption

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Ludovic Marin/AP

Niger's presidential guard has detained President Bazoum, raising fears of a coup

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Niger's Electoral Commission workers count the ballots at a polling station during Niger's presidential election runoff in Niamey on Sunday. In the country's west, a vehicle carrying poll workers struck a landmine, killing seven and seriously wounding three others. It's unclear if the vehicle was deliberately attacked. Issouf Sanogo/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Issouf Sanogo/AFP via Getty Images

Nigerien commandos simulate a raid on a militant camp during U.S.-sponsored exercises in Ouallam, Niger, in April 2018. A spokesman for the Nigerien army says 71 soldiers were killed in an attack on Tuesday. Aaron Ross/Reuters hide caption

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Aaron Ross/Reuters

The remains of Staff Sgt. Dustin Wright are transferred at Dover Air Force Base, Del., in October. Wright and three other American soldiers were killed in an ambush in Niger. Pfc. Lane Hiser/U.S. Army via AP hide caption

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Pfc. Lane Hiser/U.S. Army via AP

Pentagon Report: Multiple Failures Led To Deaths Of 4 Troops In Niger

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Members of the 3rd Special Forces Group, 2nd Battalion salute the casket of U.S. Army Sgt. La David Johnson at his burial service in Hollywood, Fla., on Oct. 21. Johnson and three other U.S. soldiers were killed in an ambush in Niger on Oct. 4. Gaston De Cardenas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gaston De Cardenas/AFP/Getty Images

Pentagon Niger Ambush Report Will Not Assign Blame For Soldiers' Deaths

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A U.S. Army team transfers the remains of Staff Sgt. Dustin Wright, 29, of Lyons, Ga., at Dover Air Force Base, Del., on Oct. 5. Wright was one of four U.S. troops killed in an ambush in Niger. Staff Sgt. Aaron J. Jenne/U.S. Air Force via AP hide caption

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Staff Sgt. Aaron J. Jenne/U.S. Air Force via AP

Four American soldiers were killed in Niger last Oct 4. From left, they are Staff Sgt. Bryan C. Black, 35, of Puyallup, Wash.; Staff Sgt. Jeremiah W. Johnson, 39, of Springboro, Ohio; Sgt. La David Johnson of Miami Gardens, Fla.; and Staff Sgt. Dustin M. Wright, 29, of Lyons, Ga. A Pentagon report cites multiple failures with the mission, and the military is now briefing families of those killed. AP hide caption

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AP

Pentagon Acknowledges Mistakes As It Briefs Families Of Troops Killed In Niger

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Senegalese Army Gen. Amadou Kane (left) receives the 2016 Flintlock flag from U.S. Army Gen. Donald Bolduc during the inauguration of a military base in Thiès, Senegal, in February 2016, during a three-week joint military exercise between African, U.S. and European troops known as Flintlock. Seyllou/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Seyllou/AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. Has No Clear Strategy For Africa. Here's Why It Really Needs One

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A U.S. Army team transfers the remains of Staff Sgt. Dustin Wright, 29, of Lyons, Ga., at Dover Air Force Base, Del., on Oct. 5, 2017. Wright was one of four U.S. troops killed in an ambush in Niger. Staff Sgt. Aaron J. Jenne/U.S. Air Force via AP hide caption

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Staff Sgt. Aaron J. Jenne/U.S. Air Force via AP

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, with Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis, testifies during a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on Congress's power to authorize the use of military force. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP