Niger Niger

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, with Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis, testifies during a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on Congress's power to authorize the use of military force. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., and Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., talk about their introduction of a new Authorization for the Use of Military Force against ISIS, al-Qaida and the Taliban during a news conference at the U.S. Capitol on May 25, 2017. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A Look At The Presence Of ISIS And Its Affiliated Groups In Africa

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/560826204/560827396" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Images provided by the U.S. Army of soldiers killed in Niger show, from left, Staff Sgt. Bryan C. Black, 35, of Puyallup, Wash.; Staff Sgt. Jeremiah W. Johnson, 39, of Springboro, Ohio; Sgt. La David Johnson of Miami Gardens, Fla.; and Staff Sgt. Dustin M. Wright, 29, of Lyons, Ga. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Myeshia Johnson, widow of U.S. Army Sergeant La David Johnson, who was among four special forces soldiers killed in Niger, sits with her daughter, Ah'Leeysa Johnson at a graveside service in Hollywood, Fla., on Oct. 21. Joe Skipper/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Skipper/Reuters

Myeshia Johnson kisses the casket of her husband, Army Sgt. La David Johnson, during his burial service on Saturday in Hollywood, Florida. Sgt. Johnson and three other U.S. soldiers were killed in an ambush in Niger on October 4. GASTON DE CARDENAS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
GASTON DE CARDENAS/AFP/Getty Images

A U.S. Army team transfers the remains of Staff Sgt. Dustin Wright, 29, of Lyons, Ga., at Dover Air Force Base, Del., on Oct. 5. Wright was one of four U.S. troops killed in an ambush in Niger. U.S. forces work with many African militaries. While the Americans are advising and assisting in most cases, they also travel into the field, where they can face combat. Staff Sgt. Aaron J. Jenne/U.S. Air Force via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Staff Sgt. Aaron J. Jenne/U.S. Air Force via AP

Assaga camp in Niger is home to some 6,000 refugees, either displaced within the country or from across the border in Nigeria. Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images

One Mother's Perspective On What It's Like To Be A Refugee

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/482792609/482832782" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Flimsy straw shelters at the Assaga refugee camp house Nigerians and displaced people within Niger who have fled from Boko Haram raids. They say they are hungry and need more food aid. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

Why Niger Is Having A Horrible Year

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/479274192/479274193" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

French President Francois Hollande gestures as he delivers a speech to foreign ambassadors during a ceremony to extend New Year wishes at the Elysee Palace in Paris on Friday. Jacques Brinon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jacques Brinon/AP

They're participants in Niger's School for Husbands. Ron Haviv/VII for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ron Haviv/VII for NPR

School For Husbands Gets Men To Talk About Family Size

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/358113783/366956684" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript