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Before each mission with NASA astronauts, the Shelton family sends a bouquet of roses to the Mission Control Center at the Johnson Space Center in Houston. James Blair/NASA hide caption

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James Blair/NASA

Astronaut launches are returning to the U.S. For each, this family sends NASA roses

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Perfume flower grower Pierre Chiarla picks jasmine flowers in his field in Grasse, France. Bénédicte Desrus for NPR hide caption

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Bénédicte Desrus for NPR

In France's Perfume Capital Of The World, There's A World Of Beautiful Fragrance

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Gold medalist Lee Kiefer of the United States shows her medal and victory bouquet during the medal ceremony for the women's individual foil final competition on Sunday at the Summer Olympics. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Hassan Ammar/AP

An employee places bouquets on shelves in Bogotá on Feb. 1, as Colombia prepares to export flowers for Valentine's Day amid the new coronavirus pandemic. Juan Barreto/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Juan Barreto/AFP via Getty Images

There's A Good Chance Your Valentine's Flowers Come From Colombia

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Flowers are being destroyed at the flower auction in Aalsmeer, Netherlands, on March 16, 2020. The Dutch horticultural sector is sounding the alarm about the effects of the coronavirus crisis. Due to the loss of demand, the auctions are struggling with low prices and the need to destroy the flowers. Lex Van Lieshout/ANP/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Lex Van Lieshout/ANP/AFP via Getty Images

Agnes Igoye celebrates her birthday on International Women's Day. Above, Igoye, an anti-trafficking activist in Uganda, attends the 2016 DVF (Diane von Furstenberg) Awards in New York City. Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images

A modern moth with a proboscis, the organ adapted for sucking up fluids such as nectar. Newly discovered fossil evidence suggests ancestors of such animals exists before flowering plants, raising questions about what ancient butterflies and moths used their tongue-like appendages for. Hossein Rajaei/Science Advances hide caption

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Hossein Rajaei/Science Advances

'Butterfly Tongues' Are More Ancient Than Flowers, Fossil Study Finds

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Scientists say bumblebees can sense flowers' electric fields through the bees' fuzzy hairs. Jens Meyer/AP hide caption

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Jens Meyer/AP

Bumblebees' Little Hairs Can Sense Flowers' Electric Fields

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On Feb. 1, Phanice Cherop works at the AAA Growers' farm in Nyahururu, four hours' drive north of the capital Nairobi, in Kenya. Last year Kenya exported more than 6.8 million cut flowers to the United States. Ilya Gridneff/AP hide caption

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Ilya Gridneff/AP

PHOTOS: Where Your Roses (Maybe) Came From

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Ready, set, fly! The ball bearings glued to this bumblebee's legs simulate the weight and placement of pollen loads. The tag on the insect's back is a lightweight sensor, designed to track its movements in flight. Courtesy of Andrew Mountcastle hide caption

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Courtesy of Andrew Mountcastle

Heavy Loads Of Pollen May Shift Flight Plans Of The Bumblebee

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