Ferguson, Mo. Ferguson, Mo.
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Ferguson, Mo.

The protest movement that has sprung up around police violence and criminal justice reform first spread like wildfire online, which researchers say allowed activists to circumvent traditional new media to get their message out. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Ferguson Mayor James Knowles speaks during a Feb. 2 City Council meeting, where residents spoke with city leaders following a preliminary consent agreement with the Justice Department. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Ferguson Mayor: 'There Was No Agreement' With The Justice Department

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A new report by a governor-appointed commission suggests ways for communities in St. Louis to move forward after the police killing of Michael Brown last summer. Here, Brown's father and other relatives pray at a memorial to Brown last month. Rick Wilking/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Rick Wilking/Reuters /Landov

A new Justice Department report gave a total of 113 lessons learned and a half-dozen themes that "permeated all aspects of the police response" during the height of the demonstrations in Ferguson, Mo., last year. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

President Obama spoke with Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep at the White House last week. Nick Michael/NPR hide caption

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Nick Michael/NPR

A Year After Ferguson, Obama Tells NPR He Feels 'Great Urgency'

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Community Divides Are Still Wide A Year Later In Ferguson

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After Tumultuous Year For Police And African-Americans, What's Changed?

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Sam's Meat Market was looted and vandalized at least three times during the unrest in Ferguson, Mo., last year. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

Ferguson Businesses Struggle To Rebuild Post-Riots

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Metropolitan Division officers finish another "rollback" operation. They searched the apartment of a paroled armed robber and gang member. These rollbacks are a cornerstone of the Metro Division's strategy of tracking people who may re-offend, and suppressing crime before it happens. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

Nationwide Crime Spike Has Law Enforcement Retooling Its Approach

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A number of state lawmakers have passed bills to bolster body cameras or have more streamlined investigations of police shootings. But State Rep. Michael Butler (D-St. Louis) says, "Folks in Missouri are afraid to have the race conversation." Michael Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Thomas/Getty Images

Missouri Slow To Advance A Post-Ferguson Agenda

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Sgt. Patrick Swanton of the Waco Police Department speaks to the media as Texas Department of Public Safety Trooper D.L. Wilson (left) stands near a Twin Peaks restaurant where nine members of a motorcycle gang were shot and killed in Waco, Texas, on Tuesday. Mike Stone/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Mike Stone/Reuters/Landov

Ferguson activists march through downtown St. Louis during a protest last month. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Ferguson Activists Hope That Momentum Sparks A National Movement

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