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ecology

Humans would do better to accept many of the life forms that share our space, than to scrub them all away, says ecologist Rob Dunn. Basic Books hide caption

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Basic Books

Counting The Bugs And Bacteria, You're 'Never Home Alone' (And That's OK)

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A female Scandinavian brown bear with her cub. Mother bears take care of their young for a year longer, likely due to hunting regulations that protect bears with cubs. Ilpo Kojola/Nature hide caption

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Ilpo Kojola/Nature

Mother Bears Are Staying With Their Cubs Longer, Study Finds

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A white-throated round-eared bat (Tonatia silvicola) catches — and munches — a katydid on Barro Colorado Island in Panama. Katydids are "the potato chips of the rain forest," scientists say. Christian Ziegler/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Christian Ziegler/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images

Sound Matters: Sex And Death In The Rain Forest

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For 15 years, biologists in single-person, ultralight aircraft would each lead an experimental flock of young whooping cranes from Wisconsin to a winter home in Florida. But not anymore. Dave Umberger/AP hide caption

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Dave Umberger/AP

To Make A Wild Comeback, Cranes Need More Than Flying Lessons

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Green when young, and about the size of an adult human's hand when full-grown, Dryococelus australis is more commonly known as the Lord Howe Island stick insect, or the tree lobster. Courtesy of Rohan Cleave/Melbourne Zoo hide caption

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Courtesy of Rohan Cleave/Melbourne Zoo

Love Giant Insects? Meet The Tree Lobster, Back From The Brink

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Fresh oil puddles on the white sand in Orange Beach, Ala., during the BP oil spill in 2010. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

5 Years After BP Oil Spill, Experts Debate Damage To Ecosystem

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N. gardneri mushrooms grow at the base of young babassu palms in Brazil. A bland tan by day, the fungi emit an eerie green light by night. Michele P. Verderane/IP-USP hide caption

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Michele P. Verderane/IP-USP

Why Some Mushrooms Glow In The Dark

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Ecologists found signs of Ebola in a Rousettus leschenaultii fruit bat. These bats are widespread across south Asia, from India to China. Kevin Olival/EcoHealth Alliance hide caption

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Kevin Olival/EcoHealth Alliance

Where Could Ebola Strike Next? Scientists Hunt Virus In Asia

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An earlier spring in Montana's Glacier National Park means full waterfalls at first — but much drier summers. Robert Glusic/Corbis hide caption

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Robert Glusic/Corbis

There's A Big Leak In America's Water Tower

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