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Leitha Dollarhyde, a retired caregiver who lives in a rural town near Whitesburg, Ky., says she could not afford an unexpected $1,000 expense. Sydney Boles for NPR hide caption

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Sydney Boles for NPR

Poll: Many Rural Americans Struggle With Financial Insecurity, Access To Health Care

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Fort Scott, Kan., fills up on weekday afternoons as locals grab pizza, visit a coffeehouse or browse antique shops and a bookstore. Like other rural communities, the commercial areas also include empty storefronts. Christopher Smith for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Christopher Smith for Kaiser Health News

No Mercy: How A Kansas Town Is Grappling With Its Hospital's Closure

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Before it closed March 1, the 25-bed Columbia River Hospital, in Celina, Tenn., served the town of 1,500 residents. The closest hospital now is 18 miles from Celina — a 30-minute or more drive on mountain roads. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

Economic Ripples: Hospital Closure Hurts A Town's Ability To Attract Retirees

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Charlotte Potts, who has a history of heart problems, lives within sight of Livingston Regional Hospital. After a recent stint there, she was discharged into the care of a home health agency, and now gets treatment in her apartment for some ailments. Shalina Chatlania / WPLN hide caption

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Shalina Chatlania / WPLN

How Helping Patients Get Good Care At Home Helps Rural Hospitals Survive

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Social worker Lauren Rainbow (right) meets a man illegally camped in the woods in Snohomish County. A new program in the county helps people with addiction, instead of arresting them. Leah Nash for Finding Fixes podcast hide caption

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Leah Nash for Finding Fixes podcast

A Rural Community Decided To Treat Its Opioid Problem Like A Natural Disaster

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A drug specialist in the Mexican army shows crystal methamphetamine paste seized at a clandestine laboratory in Mexico's Baja California in August. Much of the meth sold in the U.S. today comes from Mexico, according to DEA officials. GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images

Methamphetamine Roils Rural Towns Again Across The U.S.

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Houses lie at the base of Colorado National Monument. The school district in Grand Junction knows it could take years to see whether their efforts towards suicide prevention have worked. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

How One Colorado Town Is Tackling Suicide Prevention — Starting With The Kids

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When the mines in the North Fork Valley started laying off employees, Eric and Teresa Neal hired and retrained former coal miners to learn how to work with fiber optic cable. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

A Rural Colorado Coal County Was Struggling. Then A Tech Company Brought New Jobs

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Drug addiction is a big concern to rural Americans, according to a new poll from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Alice Goldfarb/NPR hide caption

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Alice Goldfarb/NPR

NPR Poll: Rural Americans Are Worried About Addiction And Jobs, But Remain Optimistic

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Proponents of hospital mergers say the change can help struggling nonprofit hospitals "thrive," with an infusion of cash to invest in updated technology and top clinical staff. But research shows the price of care, especially for low-income patients, usually rises when a hospital joins a for-profit corporation. Jens Magnusson/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Jens Magnusson/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Struggling to stay afloat, a rural hospital in Missouri took a chance on new managers. Dan Margolies/KCUR hide caption

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Dan Margolies/KCUR

Vulnerable Rural Hospitals Face Tough Decisions On Questionable Billing Schemes

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Up to one half of rural residents are covered by Medicaid, says Michelle Mills, CEO of Colorado Rural Health Center. And they're typically older, poorer and sicker than city dwellers. John Daley/CPR hide caption

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John Daley/CPR

Researchers point to a number of causes for dwindling farmworkers: tighter border controls; higher prices charged by smugglers; well-paying construction jobs and a growing middle-class in Mexico that doesn't want to pick vegetables for Americans. Sandy Huffaker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sandy Huffaker/AFP/Getty Images

Health Risks To Farmworkers Increase As Workforce Ages

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Tessa Anklin says Covered California health plans are too expensive for her family. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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April Dembosky/KQED

Rural Californians Want Price Relief From GOP Health Bill, But Most Won't Get It

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A mountain of mine tailings frame a Bisbee park — a legacy of the copper mines that once fueled the local economy. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Doctor Shortage In Rural Arizona Sparks Another Crisis In 'Forgotten America'

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Greta Elliott, who manages a health clinic in Canby, Calif., says she didn't buy health insurance for herself because she thinks it's too expensive. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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April Dembosky/KQED

In A Conservative Corner Of California, A Push To Preserve Obamacare

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Hugo, Colo., is home to no more than 850 residents, but has a beloved hospital where staff members know most of their patients by name. To survive financially, the hospital depends on payments from Medicaid, a program that faces deep cuts in the GOP health bill. Hart Van Denburg/CPR hide caption

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Hart Van Denburg/CPR

A Hospital In Rural Colorado Is The Cornerstone Of Small Town Life

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Coal and steel jobs were once plentiful in Steubenville, Ohio. Today, the local hospital is the top employer in the county. Courtesy of Rana Xavier hide caption

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Courtesy of Rana Xavier

After Decline Of Steel And Coal, Ohio Fears Health Care Jobs Are Next

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Dr. Adam McMahan has been practicing medicine in rural Alaska for three years. It's the kind of intimate, full-spectrum family medicine the 34-year-old doctor loves. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

In Rural Alaska, A Young Doctor Walks To His Patient's Bedside

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Dr. Farooq Habib (left) and Dr. Muhammad Tauseef share an office at Los Barrios Unidos Community Clinic in Dallas. They're both from Pakistan and have both worked as pediatricians in medically underserved areas in the U.S. Lauren Silverman/KERA hide caption

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Lauren Silverman/KERA

Trump Travel Ban Spotlights U.S. Dependence On Foreign-Born Doctors

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