rural health rural health

Greta Elliott, who manages a health clinic in Canby, Calif., says she didn't buy health insurance for herself because she thinks it's too expensive. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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April Dembosky/KQED

In A Conservative Corner Of California, A Push To Preserve Obamacare

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Hugo, Colo., is home to no more than 850 residents, but has a beloved hospital where staff members know most of their patients by name. To survive financially, the hospital depends on payments from Medicaid, a program that faces deep cuts in the GOP health bill. Hart Van Denburg/CPR hide caption

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Hart Van Denburg/CPR

A Hospital In Rural Colorado Is The Cornerstone Of Small Town Life

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Coal and steel jobs were once plentiful in Steubenville, Ohio. Today, the local hospital is the top employer in the county. Courtesy of Rana Xavier hide caption

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Courtesy of Rana Xavier

After Decline Of Steel And Coal, Ohio Fears Health Care Jobs Are Next

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Dr. Adam McMahan has been practicing medicine in rural Alaska for three years. It's the kind of intimate, full-spectrum family medicine the 34-year-old doctor loves. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

In Rural Alaska, A Young Doctor Walks To His Patient's Bedside

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Dr. Farooq Habib (left) and Dr. Muhammad Tauseef share an office at Los Barrios Unidos Community Clinic in Dallas. They're both from Pakistan and have both worked as pediatricians in medically underserved areas in the U.S. Lauren Silverman/KERA hide caption

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Lauren Silverman/KERA

Trump Travel Ban Spotlights U.S. Dependence On Foreign-Born Doctors

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Melissa Morris outside her home in Sterling, Colo. She quit using heroin in 2012, and now relies on the drug Suboxone to stay clean. She's also been helping to find treatment for some of the neighbors she used to sell drugs to. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Rural Colorado's Opioid Connections Might Hold Clues To Better Treatment

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Construction of Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital in Greensboro, N.C., was partially funded by the Hill-Burton Act. The hospital, seen circa 1973, was at the center of a court case, Simkins v. Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital, that brought an end to racially segregated health care. Cone Health Medical Library hide caption

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Cone Health Medical Library

Most women get prenatal care from the doctor they expect will deliver the baby, which can make it difficult if the doctor and hospital are far away. Tim Hale/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Hale/Getty Images

Amy Thomson holds 2-month-old Isla in Seattle Children's Hospital in early 2014. When the Thomson family learned Isla's heart was failing, they took an air ambulance from Butte, Mont., to Seattle to get medical care. Courtesy of the Thomson family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Thomson family

Lifesaving Flights Can Come With Life-Changing Bills

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Mendocino, Calif., lures vacationing tourists and retirees. But the lone hospital on this remote stretch of coast, in nearby Fort Bragg, is struggling financially. David McSpadden/Wikimedia hide caption

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David McSpadden/Wikimedia

Mendocino Coast Fights To Keep Its Lone Hospital Afloat

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Hereford, Texas, may have lovely vistas, but it's notably short of mental health care options. Kirk Kittell/Flickr hide caption

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Kirk Kittell/Flickr

Texas Strives To Lure Mental Health Providers To Rural Counties

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Dr. Bill Mahon says a gorgeous coast and the chance to practice a more personal style of community medicine lured him to remote Fort Bragg, Calif., 35 years ago. Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED hide caption

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Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED

Susan Cahill, owner of All Families Healthcare, stands in front of the first building in Kalispell, Mont., where she offered abortion services. After vandalism closed her last clinic down, Missoula became the nearest place for women in the Flathead Valley to find abortion services. Corin Cates-Carney/MTPR hide caption

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Corin Cates-Carney/MTPR

How Vandalism And Fear Ended Abortion In Northwest Montana

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One of the first signs drivers see on the way into Unionville, Mo. is this billboard advertising cardiology at Putnam County Memorial Hospital. Offering specialty services, like cardiology and psychiatry turned the hospital around, community leaders say. Bram Sable-Smith/KBIA/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Bram Sable-Smith/KBIA/Side Effects Public Media

Expanding, Not Shrinking, Saves A Small Rural Hospital

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Registered nurses Cassie Gregor (from left), Camellia Douglas and Mike Montalto monitor patients in intensive care units scattered around North Carolina. Kevin McCarthy/Carolinas HealthCare System hide caption

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Kevin McCarthy/Carolinas HealthCare System

Staffing An Intensive Care Unit From Miles Away Has Advantages

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In the documentary Remote Area Medical, a boy chooses a new pair of glasses after receiving an eye exam. Remote Area Medical/Courtesy of Cinedigm hide caption

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Remote Area Medical/Courtesy of Cinedigm

Lorenzo Dorr works at the grass-roots level to help deliver health services in far-flung areas of Liberia. In July, he was on his way to meet with community health providers in Konobo, one of Liberia's most remote rural districts. Courtesy of Tiyatien Health/Last Mile Health hide caption

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Courtesy of Tiyatien Health/Last Mile Health