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Gulls were eating more juvenile salmon than biologists realized, which meant fewer of the fish were making it to the ocean. Gary Hershorn/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Hershorn/Getty Images

Chinese border patrol gunboats come downriver from the Yunnan province about once a month in a show of force to keep the Mekong River safe, as China's Xinhua News Agency puts it. Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan for NPR

China Reshapes The Vital Mekong River To Power Its Expansion

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A screenshot from a video posted by the City of Lynchburg shows water flowing over Lakeside Drive, which runs atop the College Lake Dam in the Virginia city. City of Lynchburg via Facebook/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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City of Lynchburg via Facebook/Screenshot by NPR

Beavers are known as "ecosystem engineers," species that make precise and transformative changes to their lived environment. Larry Smith/Flickr hide caption

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Larry Smith/Flickr

The Bountiful Benefits Of Bringing Back The Beavers

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Brazilian 76-year-old farmer Jose Pascual walks through a devastated area in Paracatu de Baixo village on October 2016, one year after a mine waste flood destroyed the town. The village was ruined in 2015 by a flood following the collapse of Brazilian mining company Samarco's waste reservoir, killing 19 people. YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images

Villagers plant rice in Srekor village. Most residents of the village — which will be submerged when a new dam starts up — have been relocated. Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan for NPR

'I Will Lose My Identity': Cambodian Villagers Face Displacement By Mekong Dam

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Reservoir caretaker Doug Billingsley tests water levels at windswept Chambers Lake near Cameron Pass, Colo. Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio

As Technology Marches On, Reservoir Caretakers Stay At Their Posts

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People paddle past a flooded house as water that breached dams upstream continues to reach the eastern part of the state on October 8, 2015 in Andrews, S.C. Many dams in the state — and across the country — are in need of repair. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Across Washington State, hydroelectric dams are blocking salmon as they migrate to their spawning grounds. Enter the salmon cannon. Ingrid Taylar/Flickr hide caption

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Ingrid Taylar/Flickr

The Salmon Cannon: Easier Than Shooting Fish Out Of A Barrel

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