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Misoprostol is currently approved by the FDA for use as an ulcer drug, not as a standalone abortion pill. Doctors already use it off-label for a variety of gynecological purposes beyond abortion, including for IUD insertion and for labor and delivery. Victor R. Caivano/AP hide caption

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Victor R. Caivano/AP

Why an ulcer drug could be the last option for many abortion patients

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Protesters rally at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus in support of abortion rights after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe vs. Wade on June 24, 2022. A judge temporarily blocked Ohio's ban on virtually all abortions on Wednesday, again pausing a law that took effect after federal abortion protections were overturned by the Supreme Court in June. Barbara J. Perenic/The Columbus Dispatch via AP hide caption

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Barbara J. Perenic/The Columbus Dispatch via AP

Indiana's attorney general, Todd Rokita, suggested that a doctor had violated state law by failing to report an abortion provided to a 10-year-old rape victim. A spokesperson for his office says that "no false or misleading statements have been made." Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

A slew of companies will cover travel expenses for employees that have to travel out of their state for an abortion after the Supreme Court overturned federal protections for the procedure. Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP hide caption

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Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP

"My body, my choice!" resonates from protesters on the front lawn of the Guam Congress Building in Hagåtña during a protest as they voiced their concerns against the Guam Heartbeat Act of 2022 on April 27, 2022. Rick Cruz/AP hide caption

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Rick Cruz/AP
Alex Brandon/AP

A number of Arizona reproductive health, rights, and justice advocates protest an abortion bill at the Arizona Capitol last year in Phoenix. The Arizona Legislature has approved a ban on abortion after 15 weeks. The House approved the measure Thursday, a month after the Senate gave its ok, and it now heads to Republican Gov. Doug Ducey for his expected signature. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

Abortion-rights activists in Colombia celebrate Monday in Bogota after the Constitutional Court approved the decriminalization of abortion, lifting all limitations on the procedure until the 24th week of pregnancy. Fernando Vergara/AP hide caption

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Fernando Vergara/AP

In Shreveport, La., the Hope Medical Group for Women is reporting more patients from nearby Texas after the passage of that state's Senate Bill 8. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

A Louisiana clinic struggles to absorb the surge created by Texas' new abortion law

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The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments on Dec. 1 in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization, which has the potential to pose a serious challenge to Roe v. Wade. J. Scott Applewhite/Associated Press hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/Associated Press

In this photo illustration, a person looks at an abortion pill (RU-486) for unintended pregnancy from Mifepristone displayed on a smartphone on May 8, 2020, in Arlington, Va. Under federal law, even in states where telemedicine abortion is legal, there are strict rules surrounding how the pill is dispensed. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

More Patients Seek Abortion Pills Online During Pandemic, But Face Restrictions

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Anti-abortion-rights activists pray outside a Planned Parenthood clinic that offers abortions in 2016 in Austin. Texas has suspended most abortions during the coronavirus pandemic. Melanie Stetson Freeman/Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images hide caption

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Melanie Stetson Freeman/Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images

A network of reproductive rights advocates is working to share information about self-induced abortion, both in person and over the Internet. Karina Perez for NPR hide caption

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Karina Perez for NPR

With Abortion Restrictions On The Rise, Some Women Induce Their Own

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ACLU of Iowa legal director Rita Bettis, shown with Emma Goldman Clinic attorney Sam Jones, said a judge's decision to temporarily block Iowa's newly passed abortion law removes uncertainty as a legal challenge to the law proceeds. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Melvine Ouyo is a reproductive health nurse at Family Health Options Kenya. She visited Washington, D.C., to discuss how the clinic has lost funding because it would not agree to the terms of President Trump's executive order banning U.S. aid to any health organization in another country that provides, advocates or makes referrals for abortions. Emily Matthews/NPR hide caption

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Emily Matthews/NPR

A report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine says that abortion is safe but that "abortion specific regulations in many states create barriers to safe and effective care." Bryce Duffy/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryce Duffy/Getty Images

Landmark Report Concludes Abortion In U.S. Is Safe

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The head of the Jackson Women's Health Organization clinic in Jackson, Miss., says she plans to sue if the governor signs the bill into law. This is the only clinic in Mississippi that performs abortions. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Abortion rights opponents gather during a rally in downtown Louisville earlier this summer. A federal judge issued an order to keep protesters away from a "buffer zone" outside the EMW Women's Surgical Center. Dylan Lovan/AP hide caption

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Dylan Lovan/AP