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Some European countries, such as Spain, are making plans for the time they might be able to treat SARS-CoV-2 as an endemic disease — one that's always around but fairly predictable. But the World Health Organization cautions that the pandemic is not over. Above: Masked pedestrians in Barcelona, Spain, in July 2021. Joan Mateu/AP hide caption

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Joan Mateu/AP

Several lines of evidence now suggest that two common vaccines against respiratory illnesses can help protect against Alzheimer's, too. How much brain protection they offer will require more intensive study to quantify, scientists say. Themba Hadebe/AP hide caption

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Themba Hadebe/AP

Flu Shot And Pneumonia Vaccine Might Reduce Alzheimer's Risk, Research Shows

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A ventilator can help patients unable to breathe on their own, but the experience of COVID-19 patients has been sobering for doctors. Taechit Taechamanodom/Getty Images hide caption

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Taechit Taechamanodom/Getty Images

Ventilators Are No Panacea For Critically Ill COVID-19 Patients

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Amir Kiani (from left), Chloe O'Connell and Nishit Asnani troubleshoot an algorithm to diagnose tuberculosis in computer lab at Stanford University. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Richard Harris/NPR

How Can Doctors Be Sure A Self-Taught Computer Is Making The Right Diagnosis?

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Is It A Nasty Cold Or The Flu?

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Cost, procrastination and a lack of insurance coverage are just a few of the reasons adults give health care providers for not getting vaccinated against shingles and other illnesses. Andrew Brookes/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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Andrew Brookes/Getty Images/Cultura RF

Do you know what the deadliest disease is? Hint: It's not Ebola (viral particles seen here in a digitally colorized microscopic image, at top right, along with similar depictions of other contagious diseases) NPR Composite/CDC hide caption

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NPR Composite/CDC