african american african american
Stories About

african american

A bullet-riddled sign that once marked where Emmett Till's body was pulled from the Tallahatchie River is now housed at the Till Interpretive Center in Sumner, Miss. The historic marker was taken down after three white fraternity brothers from the University of Mississippi were pictured holding guns next to the sign. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Debbie Elliott/NPR

'Why Don't Y'all Let That Die?' Telling The Emmett Till Story In Mississippi

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/755024458/755177187" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sadie Roberts-Joseph founded the Odell S. Williams Now & Then African American Museum in Baton Rouge, La., in 2001. She was a prominent civil rights activist and community leader. James Terry III/NAACP Baton Rouge Chapter hide caption

toggle caption
James Terry III/NAACP Baton Rouge Chapter

Philip Smith is the president and founder of the National African American Gun Association. Since its creation in 2015, the group has seen rapid growth with roughly 30,000 members and 75 chapters nationwide. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

With A Growing Membership Since Trump, Black Gun Group Considers Getting Political

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/738493491/740185748" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Robert F. Smith, founder, chairman and CEO of Vista Equity Partners, speaks at Morehouse College on Feb. 17, 2018 in Atlanta. Smith announced on Sunday he will pay off the student debt of the college's entire 2019 graduating class. Paras Griffin/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paras Griffin/Getty Images

Robert Smith Pledges To Pay Off Student Loans For Morehouse College's Class Of 2019

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/724836836/724856021" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

People line up to enter the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court Justices Seem Incredulous At Repeated Racial Bias In Jury Selection

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/705211168/705252865" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Keitra Bates (left) moved to tears upon meeting 106-year old Leila Williams at her nursing home. Bates recently discovered that Williams once ran Leila's Dinette in the building where Bates now runs Marddy's Shared Kitchen and Marketplace. Charlotte Riley-Webb for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Charlotte Riley-Webb for NPR

'Welcome To Marrdy's' - A Shared Kitchen For Local Cooks In Gentrifying West Atlanta

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/702663162/703912142" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax, D-Va., has not called for embattled Gov. Ralph Northam to resign. Should Northam step aside, Fairfax would become Virginia's second black governor. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
The Washington Post/Getty Images

Eyes On Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax As Gov. Northam Resists Calls To Resign

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/691002942/691221624" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Contemporary reprints of original Green Books from 1940 (front) and 1954. Karen Grigsby Bates hide caption

toggle caption
Karen Grigsby Bates

The Green Book: Celebrating 'The Bible of Black Travel'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/668307994/668856527" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The American Military cemetery in Margraten, Netherlands, where David McGhee's grandfather, Sgt. Willie F. Williams, is buried. Marcel Van Hoorn/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Marcel Van Hoorn/AFP/Getty Images

Mysterious Suitcase Helps Connecticut Man Discover His Grandfather's WWII Service

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/666363999/666871006" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo speaking during a security news conference in advance of the Super Bowl 52 football game, on Jan. 31, 2018. On Thursday, Arradondo said police will no longer arrest people for selling small amounts of marijuana. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matt Slocum/AP

The National Memorial for Peace and Justice, opening in Montgomery, Ala., on Thursday, is dedicated to victims of lynching. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

New Lynching Memorial Is A Space 'To Talk About All Of That Anguish'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/604271871/605864508" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Fire shoots out from a Baltimore store on Gay Street as looting erupted in a five-block business section in Baltimore on April 6, 1968. Police sealed off the area. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

50 Years Ago Baltimore Burned. The Same Issues Set It Aflame In 2015

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/600114134/600616618" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking to a mass meeting at the Mason Temple in support of striking sanitation workers. Memphis Press-Scimitar/University of Memphis Libraries Special Collections hide caption

toggle caption
Memphis Press-Scimitar/University of Memphis Libraries Special Collections

When MLK Was Killed, He Was In Memphis Fighting For Economic Justice

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/597308044/597750748" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mulusew Bekele, director of program operations at African Services Committee based in New York City, supports the U.S. Census Bureau's efforts to collect more detailed data on black people's non-Hispanic origins on the 2020 census. "The more refined data, the better for public policy," he says. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

2020 Census Will Ask Black People About Their Exact Origins

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/593272215/593272216" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript