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Patients in the study had "significantly lower out-of-pocket costs — on the average, $500 — when they visited a physical therapist first," says Bianca Frogner, a health economist at the University of Washington. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

Trying Physical Therapy First For Low Back Pain May Curb Use Of Opioids

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Leon Beers, a retired railroad engineer who lives near Sacramento, Calif., has a form of Parkinson's disease. His live-in caregiver, Timothy Wehe, helps him get outside using a walker. Bert Johnson for KHN hide caption

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Bert Johnson for KHN

New research finds that a yoga class designed specifically for back pain can be as effective as physical therapy in relieving pain. The yoga protocol includes gentle poses and avoids more difficult ones. Comstock Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Study Finds Yoga Can Help Back Pain, But Keep It Gentle, With These Poses

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Physical therapy may not help a person with a progressive chronic disease become well, but it can help slow a decline. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images

Intensive home-visits by physical, occupational and speech therapists have been "a lifesaver," for little Haylee Crouse, her mom Amanda (left) told Shots. Haylee, who is now 2, developed seizures and physical and intellectual disabilities after contracting meningitis when she was 8 days old. Wade Goodwyn/NPR hide caption

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Wade Goodwyn/NPR

Cuts In Texas Medicaid Hit Rural Kids With Disabilities Especially Hard

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It took a team of delighted friends and family to help Florida engineer Matt Bellina (center) get back on his surfboard this summer after his severe spinal injury. The result? "I feel like I'm home," Bellina said. Courtesy of Diane Wehrell-Grabowski hide caption

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Courtesy of Diane Wehrell-Grabowski

Martha and Alvaro Galvis used to travel from New Hampshire to Boston to watch the marathon every year. Both were hurt in the bombing two years ago. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Marathon Bombing Survivors Face A World That Still Feels Out Of Control

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