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Barbara Cook performs at the 120th anniversary of New York's Carnegie Hall in 2011. Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images

Barbara Cook, Tony Award-Winning Actress And Singer, Dies At 89

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Come From Away, whose cast is pictured here, is one of many musicals competing for attention in Broadway's current surge of openings. Matthew Murphy/Courtesy of Polk and Co. hide caption

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Matthew Murphy/Courtesy of Polk and Co.

Broadway Producers Reckon With A Crowded Season

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Lin-Manuel Miranda's hit musical Hamilton won 11 Tonys in 2016. It still draws sellout crowds to the Richard Rogers Theatre in New York as well to touring productions. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

A Blind Theatergoer's 'Hamilton' Lawsuit Aims Spotlight On Broadway Accessibility

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Lin-Manuel Miranda appears in Hamilton's opening night at the Richard Rodgers Theatre in New York City, in August 2015. Neilson Barnard/Getty Images hide caption

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Neilson Barnard/Getty Images

Lin-Manuel Miranda Talks 'Hamilton': Once A 'Ridiculous' Pitch, Now A Revolution

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Kiss Me, Kate is the latest in a series of American musicals to be performed at the Theatre du Chatelet in Paris. "It is such a glorious theater to perform in," says director Lee Blakeley. Vincent Pontent/Courtesy of Théâtre du Châtelet hide caption

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Vincent Pontent/Courtesy of Théâtre du Châtelet

Annaleigh Ashford plays the title character — a poodle mix — in Sylvia, at the Cort Theatre in Broadway. Matthew Broderick plays the man who finds Sylvia in Central Park. Joan Marcus/Jeffrey Richards Associates hide caption

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Joan Marcus/Jeffrey Richards Associates

Annaleigh Ashford Barks Up The Right Tree On Broadway

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Composer John Kander, 88, has received his 12th Tony nomination — this time for The Visit. "I really love the theater ..." he says. "This part, I hate; the idea that suddenly we're all put in a little sandbox where we're supposed to be very competitive with each other. And these are your friends!" Above, Chita Rivera and Michelle Veintimillia in The Visit. Thom Kaine/Courtesy of O+M Co. hide caption

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Thom Kaine/Courtesy of O+M Co.

First-Time Tony Award Nominees Enjoy New Fame, But Keep Day Jobs

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The stage version of the Hollywood classic An American in Paris combines British, French and American artistic traditions and stars Leanne Cope and Robert Fairchild in the roles made famous by Leslie Caron and Gene Kelly. Marie-Noelle Robert /Courtesy of Theatre du Chatelet hide caption

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Marie-Noelle Robert /Courtesy of Theatre du Chatelet

The French Go Crazy For 'An American In Paris'

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James Earl Jones was born in Mississippi and grew up in Michigan. He was adopted by his grandparents and eventually developed a stutter. "I'm still a stutterer," he says. "I just work with it." Stephen Chernin/AP hide caption

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Stephen Chernin/AP

James Earl Jones: From Stutterer To Janitor To Broadway Star

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