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People stand on the Vilas Bridge, in Bellows Falls, Rockingham, Vt., to watch the water from the Connecticut River flow through on Monday, July 10, 2023. Heavy rain has washed out roads and forced evacuations in the Northeast, especially in Vermont and New York. Kristopher Radder/AP hide caption

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Kristopher Radder/AP

Floodwater surrounds a house on Sept. 1, 2021, in Jean Lafitte, La. Hurricane Ida made landfall as a powerful Category 4 causing flooding and wind damage along the Gulf Coast. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Medical student Emily Davis, left, speaks with her landlord Suzannah Thames on Friday as workers move furniture, appliances and other belongings out of a home Davis and her husband are renting in a flood-prone area of Jackson, Miss. Emily Wagster Pettus/AP hide caption

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Emily Wagster Pettus/AP

A New South Wales State Emergency Service (SES) crew is seen in a rescue boat as roads are submerged under floodwater from the swollen Hawkesbury River in Windsor, northwest of Sydney, Monday, July 4, 2022. Bianca De Marchi/AP hide caption

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Bianca De Marchi/AP

Carlos and Jessica Deviana sit in the back of their father's SUV, which they were using as a bedroom after Hurricane Michael destroyed their home in Panama City, Fla., in October 2018. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

You've likely been affected by climate change. Your long-term finances might be, too

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Aerial view of one of the burst dikes on the Mississippi River, April 1927. ullstein bild Dtl./ullstein bild via Getty Images hide caption

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ullstein bild Dtl./ullstein bild via Getty Images

Hurricane Harvey's devastating flooding caught many homeowners by surprise, and prompted support for more disclosure about flood risk. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

In Texas, Home Sellers Must Now Disclose More About The Risk Of Flooding

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Parts of eastern Texas could see nearly 3 feet of rain through Friday, forecasters say, warning of potential flash floods from Tropical Depression Imelda. Here, Angel Marshman walks through floodwaters in Galveston after trying to start his flooded car Wednesday. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Tulsa's flood control plan includes multi-use drainage basins, like the athletic field at Will Rogers High School. It doubles as a detention pond for overflowing storm water. Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma

How Tulsa Became A Model For Preventing Floods

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The levees below the Oroville Dam were damaged by heavy floodwaters this winter and many need repairs. Lauren Sommer/KQED hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/KQED

Where Levees Fail In California, Nature Can Step In To Nurture Rivers

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Danny and Alys Messenger canoe away from their flooded home in Prairieville, La., after reviewing the damage. As waters begin to recede in parts of Louisiana, some residents have struggled to return to flood-damaged homes on foot, in cars and by boat. Max Becherer/AP hide caption

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Max Becherer/AP

Flooding on U.S. 51 in the Village of Tangipahoa, La. Heavy rains have caused rivers to crest in Louisiana and neighboring Mississippi, closing schools and roads and stranding residents. Courtesy of Louisiana Department of Transportation hide caption

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Courtesy of Louisiana Department of Transportation

A small memorial marks the former homestead of the Nicely family, who died in the June flooding of White Sulphur Springs, W. Va. Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Emotional Healing After A Flood Can Take Just As Long As Rebuilding

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Shane Altzier sweeps out the mud from the utilities office in Rainelle, W.Va., one of the towns hardest hit by floods that tore through the state on Friday. More rain this week has slowed cleanup efforts. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

A building on Fort Hood Army Base in Fort Hood, Texas, is seen in this 2014 photo. Rescue crews were searching for four soldiers missing after a training accident on Thursday. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Homes in Pacific, Mo., are surrounded by floodwaters on Wednesday. A rare winter flood threatened nearly two dozen federal levees in Missouri and Illinois on Wednesday as rivers rose, prompting evacuations in several places. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP