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Automating Inequality by Virginia Eubanks Eslah Attar/NPR hide caption

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Eslah Attar/NPR

'Automating Inequality': Algorithms In Public Services Often Fail The Most Vulnerable

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Employees work on automobile parts at a production line at the BMW factory in Shenyang, China, on Nov. 22. Twelve percent of workers in China could need to switch jobs by 2030, researchers say. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

A prototype Moby Mart is being tested in Shanghai. Per Cromwell, the project's lead designer, says four to six additional mobile supermarkets are planned in the coming year. Moby Mart hide caption

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Moby Mart

Robots move racks of merchandise at an Amazon fulfillment center in Tracy, Calif. When a robot finds its storage unit, it glides underneath, lifts it up and then delivers it to a worker. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Online Retail Boom Means More Warehouse Workers, And Robots To Accompany Them

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Starship Technologies' delivery robots, which can be found traveling the sidewalks of Washington, D.C., get smarter the more they drive — learning about sidewalk and traffic patterns with every trip they take. Meg Kelly/NPR hide caption

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Meg Kelly/NPR

Hungry? Call Your Neighborhood Delivery Robot

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Otto developed technology to allow big-rig trucks to drive themselves. Uber, another transportation company working on self-driving technology, acquired Otto in August. Tony Avelar/AP hide caption

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Tony Avelar/AP

For The Long Haul, Self-Driving Trucks May Pave The Way Before Cars

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Customers use interactive kiosks to place orders at Eatsa, a fully automated fast food restaurant in San Francisco. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

As Our Jobs Are Automated, Some Say We'll Need A Guaranteed Basic Income

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A pedestrian crosses in front of a vehicle as part of a demonstration at Mcity on July 20, on the University of Michigan campus in Ann Arbor, Mich. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

In Michigan, A Testing Ground For A Future Of Driverless Cars

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NPR's Robert Siegel and Michael Minielly, a Mercedes-Benz representative, drive a new S550 4Matic, which allows for semi-autonomous driving. Rob Ballenger /NPR hide caption

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Rob Ballenger /NPR

Hands-Free, Mind-Free: What We Lose Through Automation

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