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The Iraqi Taha Al-J. is led into the courtroom at Frankfurt's Higher Regional Court before the verdict is pronounced in Frankfurt, Germany, on Tuesday. Frank Rumpenhorst/AP hide caption

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Frank Rumpenhorst/AP

Kamo Zandinan says goodbye in the Mosul orphanage to a 10-year-old girl she believes is her daughter Sonya, taken from her by ISIS six years ago. The girl was rescued by police in March from an Arab family to whom she was not related. Zandinan is waiting for DNA tests to confirm whether the girl is her daughter. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

A Yazidi Woman Searches For Her Lost Daughter, Kidnapped By ISIS 6 Years Ago

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About 200,000 displaced Yazidis are in camps in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. Many are waiting for help to rebuild homes damaged or destroyed by ISIS in 2014. Andrea DiCenzo for NPR hide caption

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Andrea DiCenzo for NPR

A Yazidi Survivor's Struggle Shows The Pain That Endures After ISIS Attack

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Mazen (right), 13, and his brother Mezban in a camp for displaced Yazidis in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. Mazen was freed recently, five years after being kidnapped by ISIS. He was found in Baghouz, the last ISIS stronghold in Syria. His brother was also kidnapped and, 2-1/2 years ago, was rescued with their mother. The boys' father is still missing. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Freed From ISIS, Few Yazidis Return To Suffering Families, Many Remain Missing

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Like other spring holidays, Sere Sal, the Yazidi new year, is about fertility and new life. An ancient Kurdish religious minority, the Yazidis color eggs for the holiday in honor of the colors that Tawus Melek, God's chief angel, is said to have spread throughout the new world. Nawaf Ashur hide caption

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Nawaf Ashur

Najla Hussin and her mother at their makeshift home in a village of displaced Yazidis near Dohuk in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Yazidi Women Finally Go To School, Defying Former ISIS Rulers — And Their Own Parents

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A Yazidi tomb in a village in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. Many families were displaced when ISIS killed hundreds of men and kidnapped thousands of women and children. More than 3,000 Yazidis are still missing. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

This Man Has Freed Hundreds Of Yazidis Captured By ISIS. Thousands Remain Missing

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Before ISIS attacked it, the northern Iraqi town of Snuny had a population of nearly 150,000 — a mix of Kurdish Muslims and Yazidis, who belong to a religious ethnic minority in this region. Only about 10,000 have returned after Kurdish fighters reclaimed the city. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

ISIS May Be Gone, But Life Has Yet To Return To Normal In Northern Iraq

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The temple of Sharfadin in Northern Iraq is 800 years old, and followers of the Yazidi religion consider it one of the most sacred sites in the world. Though ISIS tried to destroy it, a small group of Yazidi fighters kept the shrine standing. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

Outmanned And Outgunned, Fighters Defend Yazidi Shrine Against ISIS

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An Iraqi man inspects the remains of what are believed to be members of the Yazidi minority, in the northern village of Sinuni on Feb. 3. Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images

In A Somber Homecoming, Yazidis Grieve And Watch Over Their Dead

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Displaced demonstrators from the minority Yazidi sect demonstrate outside the United Nations offices in Irbil, Iraq, on Aug. 4 in support of those held captive by the self-proclaimed Islamic State. Azad Lashkari/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Azad Lashkari/Reuters/Landov

ISIS Captives Tell Of Rapes And Beatings, Plead For Help

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