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child marriage

Ya Kaka, left, and Hauwa, right, who were captured by Boko Haram in 2014, pose with Statue of Liberty impersonators in Times Square. Stephanie Sinclair /Too Young to Wed hide caption

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Stephanie Sinclair /Too Young to Wed

Durga, now 22, was married in her northern Indian village at the age of 15. Her father forced her into the marriage. But he had a change of heart right after the wedding and refused to send her to her husband. After much careful diplomacy, he managed to dissolve the union. Swati Vashishtha for NPR hide caption

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Swati Vashishtha for NPR

The modest proposal: Keep your daughter in school for two years and don't marry her off and you'll get a goat or two chickens. The animals pictured above live in Ethiopia, where the strategy to stop child marriage was tested. David Cayless/Getty Images hide caption

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David Cayless/Getty Images

Graciela Garcia, 19, married her high school friend, Jaime, when she was 15. Natasha Pizzey hide caption

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Natasha Pizzey

Why Child Marriage Persists In Mexico

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Durga has just earned her undergraduate degree. Because of her accomplishment, the groom and his family have said they no longer consider her a good match. "They are scared of an educated bride," says Durga's father, Lumbaram. Swati Vashishtha for NPR hide caption

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Swati Vashishtha for NPR

Sulmi, 14, of Guatemala was 9 months pregnant when this photo was taken. "I was a little sad to be married so young," she says. "I am in the youngest in my family to be in a union. Getting married is a lot better and prettier because you get to wear a big white dress." Stephanie Sinclair/ Too Young to Wed hide caption

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Stephanie Sinclair/ Too Young to Wed

Eunice, pictured above, is one of the workshop participants: "Today I learned a girl can do anything — that a boy and girl are equal, no one is more special, and I am happy about it. I am happy that the new things I learned today [are] to be confident and be powerful." Mercy/Too Young To Wed/Samburu Girls Foundation hide caption

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Mercy/Too Young To Wed/Samburu Girls Foundation

Jacqueline de Chollet of Switzerland, now 78, helped found the Veerni Institute, which gives child brides and other girls in northern India a chance to continue their education. Yana Paskova for NPR hide caption

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Yana Paskova for NPR

A Chance Encounter On A Vacation Changed Her Life — And The Lives Of Child Brides

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Durga studies for final exams in her second year of college. Swati Vashishtha for NPR hide caption

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Swati Vashishtha for NPR

A Father Vows To Save His Daughter From A Marriage He Forced Her Into

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In this November 2015 photo, A 17-year-old mother sits with her baby in the Inhassune village, in southern Mozambique. In Mozambique there are no laws preventing child marriages and existing child protection laws offer loopholes. If a community decides that a girl is to be married in a traditional ceremony, with or without her consent, lawmakers are powerless to intervene. Shiraaz Mohamed/AP hide caption

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Shiraaz Mohamed/AP