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Wim Janssen, one of the musicians involved in the recording project, plays a viola made by master luthier Girolamo Amati in 1615. Courtesy of Native Instruments hide caption

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Courtesy of Native Instruments

An Italian Town Fell Silent So The Sounds Of A Stradivarius Could Be Preserved

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The Totenberg-Ames Stradivarius is pictured in a mold while being prepared to have its edge reinforced during restoration. Courtesy of Bruno Price hide caption

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Courtesy of Bruno Price

The Tale Of The Stolen Totenberg Stradivarius Ends With A New Legacy

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Mira Wang plays Roman Totenberg's long lost Ames Stradivarius violin in New York, on March 8, 2017. Wang, a former student of Totenberg's, played the instrument at a private concert in New York on March 13. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

A Stolen, Then Recovered, Stradivarius Returns To The Stage

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Documentation of Roman Totenberg's Stradivarius violin. The instrument went missing after one of Roman's concerts but was rediscovered more than three decades later. Courtesy of the Totenberg family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Totenberg family

A Rarity Reclaimed: Stolen Stradivarius Recovered After 35 Years

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Marcello Mazzucchi, a retired forest ranger, stands in the Fiemme Valley in the Italian Alps. Renaissance luthiers such as Antonio Stradivari came here to handpick trees that would be crafted into the world's finest instruments. Graziano Panfili for NPR hide caption

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Graziano Panfili for NPR

In The Italian Alps, Stradivari's Trees Live On

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The Lipinski Stradivarius is worth between $5 million and $6 million. Only about 650 Strads, made by master luthier Antonio Stradivari, survive today. Courtesy of Frank Almond hide caption

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Courtesy of Frank Almond

The Case Of The Stolen Stradivarius

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