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A scientist says pen refill reviews on Amazon are more informative that what the current peer review system offers on scientific work costing millions of dollars. Mark Airs/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Airs/Getty Images

Scientists Aim To Pull Peer Review Out Of The 17th Century

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Dr. Mathilde Krim at the World AIDS Day Symposium presented by the Foundation For AIDS Research and the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in 2002. Krim had a knack for helping people talk about HIV/AIDS rationally, colleagues say. Theo Wargo/WireImage hide caption

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Theo Wargo/WireImage

Pioneering HIV Researcher Mathilde Krim Remembered For Her Activism

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From left: Malebogo Molefhe, who uses a wheelchair because she was shot by her boyfriend, is a winner of the U.S. State Department's 2017 International Women of Courage award. Dr. Eqbal Dauqan, shown in a lab at University Kebangsaan Malaysia, won a scholarship for refugees. Mira Rai of Nepal, one of the world's top ultrarunners, was named Adventurer of the Year by National Geographic. From left: Ryan Eskalis/NPR; Sanjit Das/for NPR; and Richard Bull. hide caption

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From left: Ryan Eskalis/NPR; Sanjit Das/for NPR; and Richard Bull.

Leandro Teixeira and Richard Dubielzig of the University of Wisconsin - Madison open the whale eye package. Richard Dubielzig and Leandro Teixeira/University of Wisconsin-Madison hide caption

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Richard Dubielzig and Leandro Teixeira/University of Wisconsin-Madison

All I Want For Christmas Is A Giant Whale Eye

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Much of Albert Einstein's best-known work, including his famous formula, was conducted in Europe, but when the Nazis came to power, he and other famous scientists brought their talent to the U.S. Selimaksan/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Selimaksan/Getty Images/iStockphoto
Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Scientists Are Not So Hot At Predicting Which Cancer Studies Will Succeed

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"In college, I would tell my friends that I wanted to pursue a Ph.D., and they would chuckle and ridicule the idea," says Eqbal Dauqan, who is an assistant professor at the University Kebangsaan Malaysia at age 36. Born and raised in Yemen, Dauqan credits her "naughty" spirit for her success in a male-dominated culture. Sanjit Das for NPR hide caption

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Sanjit Das for NPR

She May Be The Most Unstoppable Scientist In The World

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The theft of agricultural trade secrets is a growing problem, according to the FBI. University of Michigan School of Environment and Sustainability/Flickr hide caption

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University of Michigan School of Environment and Sustainability/Flickr

The new report from leading U.S. scientists shines a spotlight on how the research enterprise as a whole creates incentives that can be detrimental to good research. Robert Essel NYC/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Essel NYC/Getty Images

Top Scientists Revamp Standards To Foster Integrity In Research

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Scientific Conference Planners Concerned About Immigration Policy

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Carmen Bachmann founded "Chance for Science," a website that connects refugee academics with scientists working in Germany. Thomas Victor for NPR hide caption

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Thomas Victor for NPR

While Others Saw Refugees, This German Professor Saw Human Potential

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Hanan Isweiri is a Ph.D. student at Colorado State University. She flew to Libya in January to visit with family after her father's death. She was able to re-enter the U.S. Saturday. Courtesy of Colorado State University hide caption

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Courtesy of Colorado State University

Travel Ban Keeps Scientists Out Of The Lab

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Biologist Shaun Clements counts down the seconds before emptying a vial of synthetic DNA into a stream near Alsea, Oregon. Jes Burns/Oregon Public Broadcasting/EarthFix hide caption

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Jes Burns/Oregon Public Broadcasting/EarthFix

Artist's rendering of two individuals of Siamogale melilutra, one of them feeding on a freshwater clam. Mauricio Antón/Journla of Systematic Palaeontology hide caption

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Mauricio Antón/Journla of Systematic Palaeontology

Research with living systems is never simple, scientists say, so there are many possible sources of variation in any experiment, ranging from the animals and cells to the details of lab technique. Tom Werner/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Werner/Getty Images

What Does It Mean When Cancer Findings Can't Be Reproduced?

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