National Park Service National Park Service

During the 2013 shutdown, tourists have to look at Mount Rushmore from the highway because the national memorial in Keystone, S.D., was closed. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Open Or Closed? Here's What Happens In A Partial Government Shutdown

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Virginia's Shenandoah National Park is one of 17 popular parks that would see higher peak-season entry fees under a new proposal. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

Fees To Enter Popular National Parks Would Skyrocket Under Interior Department Plan

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Bike patrol volunteers give directions to visitors at Acadia National Park. The Trump administration has rolled back an Obama-era policy put in place to encourage national parks to end the sale of bottled water. Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

Three of the national monuments now under review by the Department of the Interior: (from left to right) Gold Butte in Nevada, the Pacific Remote Islands and Giant Sequoia in Northern California. Bureau of Land Management/Flickr; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr; David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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Bureau of Land Management/Flickr; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr; David McNew/Getty Images

Multiple Twitter accounts claiming to be run by members of the National Park Service and other U.S. agencies have appeared since the Trump administration's apparent gag order. The account owners are choosing to remain anonymous. David Calvert/Getty Images hide caption

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David Calvert/Getty Images

The official Twitter account of Badlands National Park in South Dakota was the first to tweet climate change facts in defiance of the gag order placed on the Environmental Protection Agency. Francis Temman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Francis Temman/AFP/Getty Images

Early morning haze colors Mount Katahdin and its surrounding mountains as seen in 2014 from a height of land along Route 11 in Patten, Maine. The viewpoint is part of the Katahdin Woods & Waters scenic byway. Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Tamara Johnson is a new Outdoor Afro leader in Atlanta. Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR hide caption

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Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR

Code Switch Podcast, Episode 2: Being 'Outdoorsy' When You're Black Or Brown

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Stands of dead hemlock trees can be seen at Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Tennessee. Mike Belleme for NPR hide caption

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Mike Belleme for NPR

To Tame A 'Wave' Of Invasive Bugs, Park Service Introduces Predator Beetles

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Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell speaks in front of the Stonewall Inn in 2014 to announce a National Park Service initiative to identify historic sites related to the struggle for LGBT rights. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Long A Symbol, Stonewall Inn May Soon Become Monument To LGBT Rights

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A couple walk along the Cactus Forest Trail in Saguaro National Park in Tucson, Ariz., last May. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Don't Care About National Parks? The Park Service Needs You To

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Flooding and the combined traffic of thousands of cars, trucks and RVs have torn up the roads at Joshua Tree National Park's Black Rock Canyon Campground. The majority of the park's $60 million maintenance backlog is for roads like this. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Nathan Rott/NPR

National Parks Have A Long To-Do List But Can't Cover The Repair Costs

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Tourists at Grand Canyon National Park in northern Arizona wait for a shuttle bus in 2015. For years, the Grand Canyon and other big national parks have been seeing rising attendance. Felicia Fonseca/AP hide caption

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Felicia Fonseca/AP

Long Lines, Packed Campsites And Busy Trails: Our Crowded National Parks

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Flares and electric lights on oil well pads illuminate low-hanging clouds near Watford City, North Dakota. Andrew Cullen hide caption

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Andrew Cullen

Oil Boom Means Sky Watchers Hoping for Starlight Just Get Stars, Lite

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Kalen Gilliam (left) and Justis Jackson take measurements at the Urban Archaeology Corps excavation site about 10 miles outside Richmond, Va. Catherine Cozzi/Groundwork RVA hide caption

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Catherine Cozzi/Groundwork RVA

Teens Dig Into Black History As Urban Archaeologists

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