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Afghan army commandos train at the Shorab military camp in Helmand province, in southern Afghanistan, in 2017. With U.S. and NATO forces leaving in the coming months, the Afghan forces will have to confront the Taliban without support from Western countries. Massoud Hossaini/AP hide caption

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Massoud Hossaini/AP

Afghans flee to Lashkar Gah, Helmand's provincial capital, during fighting between Taliban and Afghan security forces on Monday. Local authorities estimate that some 35,000 people have been displaced into Lashkar Gah since a Taliban offensive began in Helmand. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Tens Of Thousands Flee Latest Taliban Offensive, And Afghan Civilian Casualties Rise

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New recruits of the Afghan 215th Corps assemble at Camp Shorabak in Helmand Province. Peter Breslow/NPR hide caption

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Peter Breslow/NPR

In Helmand, Afghan General Fights Taliban 'Cancer' With Some Help From U.S. Marines

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Jason Brezler in the market of Nowzad on May 7, 2010, with village elders, Afghan National Police and U.S. Marines. Maj. Brezler is now facing a possible discharge from the Marines after he emailed classified documents. Monique Jaques/Getty Images hide caption

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Monique Jaques/Getty Images

A U.S. Marine Tried To Warn A Comrade, Now He Faces A Discharge

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Afghan security forces patrol near their base in the Marjah district of Helmand province on Dec. 23. Dozens of Marines were killed in Marjah five years ago, and since then the Taliban have slipped back in. Now American forces are increasingly being drawn back into the fight. Noor Mohammad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noor Mohammad/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Forces Increasingly Drawn Back Into Afghanistan's Battles

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