biological evolution biological evolution

An international team of scientists believes it has solved the mystery of how eggs got their shapes. Frans Lanting/Mint Images RM/Getty Images hide caption

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Frans Lanting/Mint Images RM/Getty Images

How Do Eggs Get Their Shapes? Scientists Think They've Cracked It

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This wounded ant (Megaponera analis), with two termites clinging to it, is alive but likely too exhausted after battle to get back to the nest without help. Frank et al./Science Advances hide caption

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Frank et al./Science Advances

No Ant Left Behind: Warrior Ants Carry Injured Comrades Home

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A white-throated round-eared bat (Tonatia silvicola) catches — and munches — a katydid on Barro Colorado Island in Panama. Katydids are "the potato chips of the rain forest," scientists say. Christian Ziegler/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Christian Ziegler/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images

Sound Matters: Sex And Death In The Rain Forest

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Maia Stern, Adam Cole/NPR

Watch Earth's History Play Out On A Football Field

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