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biological evolution

Friend or foe? A California two-spot octopus (Octopus bimaculoides) gives observers the eye at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass. Tom Kleindinst/Marine Biological Laboratory hide caption

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Tom Kleindinst/Marine Biological Laboratory

Octopuses Get Strangely Cuddly On The Mood Drug Ecstasy

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It's a bacteria-eat-bacteria world, scientists say. Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus, shown here in false color, attacks common germs six times its size, then devours them from the inside out. Alfred Pasieka/Science Source hide caption

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Alfred Pasieka/Science Source

'Predatory Bacteria' Might Be Enlisted In Defense Against Antibiotic Resistance

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An international team of scientists believes it has solved the mystery of how eggs got their shapes. Frans Lanting/Mint Images RM/Getty Images hide caption

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Frans Lanting/Mint Images RM/Getty Images

How Do Eggs Get Their Shapes? Scientists Think They've Cracked It

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This wounded ant (Megaponera analis), with two termites clinging to it, is alive but likely too exhausted after battle to get back to the nest without help. Frank et al./Science Advances hide caption

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Frank et al./Science Advances

No Ant Left Behind: Warrior Ants Carry Injured Comrades Home

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A white-throated round-eared bat (Tonatia silvicola) catches — and munches — a katydid on Barro Colorado Island in Panama. Katydids are "the potato chips of the rain forest," scientists say. Christian Ziegler/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Christian Ziegler/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images

Sound Matters: Sex And Death In The Rain Forest

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Maia Stern, Adam Cole/NPR

Watch Earth's History Play Out On A Football Field

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