Sahel Sahel
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Sahel

Supporters of the Alliance Of Sahel States (AES) drive with flags as they celebrate Mali, Burkina Faso and Niger leaving the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) in Niamey on January 28, 2024. Hama Boureima/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Hama Boureima/AFP via Getty Images

After the coups, West Africa's Brexit moment

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Workers in front of the doors of a revered 15th-century mosque in 2016. The doors were hacked apart by jihadists in Mali's ancient city of Timbuktu in 2012 and now unveiled restored to their former glory. Now the city is under siege again. Sebastien Rieussec/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sebastien Rieussec/AFP via Getty Images

A security vacuum in the Sahel has left Timbuktu blockaded by Islamist militants

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Bombino performs at The Hamilton Live in Washington on Friday, Sept. 15, 2023. Elizabeth Frantz for NPR hide caption

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Elizabeth Frantz for NPR

Bombino sings of home on his new album 'Sahel'

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An aerial view shows the Temporary Operational Base of the United Nations Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) in Ogossagou village, Mopti region on November 5, 2021. - Ogossagou village was attacked two times in two years, in 2019 and 2020, by unidentified armed men, that killed in total more than 200 civilians in a village of less that 800 people. AMAURY HAUCHARD/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AMAURY HAUCHARD/AFP via Getty Images

Terrorist groups are expanding in Mali as peacekeepers leave, U.N. experts warn

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Supporters of the Nigerien defence and security forces gather during a demonstration outside the national assembly in Niamey on July 27, 2023. -/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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-/AFP via Getty Images

A look at what's next for Niger a day after the coup

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Supporters of the Nigerien defence and security forces gather during a demonstration outside the national assembly in Niamey on July 27, 2023. The head of Niger's armed forces on July 27, 2023 said he endorsed a declaration by troops who overnight announced they had taken power after detaining the country's elected president, Mohamed Bazoum. -/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Niger's military announces coup

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President of Niger Mohamed Bazoum delivers a speech at a financial summit in Paris, June 22. On Wednesday, he said members of the presidential guard tried to move against him. Ludovic Marin/AP hide caption

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Ludovic Marin/AP

Niger's presidential guard has detained President Bazoum, raising fears of a coup

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A woman carries a bucket of water on her head on the streets of capital city Bamako during the rainy season in Mali. Andrew Aitchison/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Aitchison/Corbis via Getty Images

The Rainy Season Strategy To Stop Malaria

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