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A California two-spot octopus extends a sucker-lined arm from its den. In 2015, this was the first octopus species to have its full genetic sequence published. Courtesy of Michael LaBarbera hide caption

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Courtesy of Michael LaBarbera

Why Octopuses Might Be The Next Lab Rats

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Friend or foe? A California two-spot octopus (Octopus bimaculoides) gives observers the eye at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass. Tom Kleindinst/Marine Biological Laboratory hide caption

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Tom Kleindinst/Marine Biological Laboratory

Octopuses Get Strangely Cuddly On The Mood Drug Ecstasy

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Inky the octopus swimming in a tank at the National Aquarium of New Zealand in Napier, New Zealand, before his escape. The National Aquarium of New Zealand via AP hide caption

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The National Aquarium of New Zealand via AP

Inky The Octopus's Great Escape

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NOAA says this ghostlike octopod, discovered more than 2 1/2 miles underwater near Hawaii, is almost certainly an undescribed species. Courtesy of NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Hohonu Moana 2016. hide caption

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Courtesy of NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Hohonu Moana 2016.

The dark red color and looming posture of this Octopus tetricus likely signals menace to another octopus nearby, say scientists who studied 186 octopus interactions in 52 hours of underwater video. David Scheel/Current Biology hide caption

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David Scheel/Current Biology

Shifting Colors Of An Octopus May Hint At A Rich, Nasty Social Life

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A juvenile California two-spot octopus (Octopus bimaculoides). Michael LaBarbera/Nature hide caption

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Michael LaBarbera/Nature

Octopus Genome Offers Insights Into One Of Ocean's Cleverest Oddballs

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