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People receive first aid after a car ran into a crowd of protesters in Charlottesville, Va., on Saturday. The car struck the silver vehicle pictured, sending marchers into the air. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Events Surrounding White Nationalist Rally In Virginia Turn Fatal

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University of Virginia administrator Nicole Eramo leaves federal court after closing arguments in her defamation lawsuit against Rolling Stone magazine in Charlottesville, Va., on Nov. 1, 2016. Steve Helber/Associated Press hide caption

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Steve Helber/Associated Press

University of Virginia administrator Nicole Eramo leaves federal court after closing arguments in her defamation lawsuit against Rolling Stone magazine in Charlottesville, Va., last week. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Reporter Sabrina Rubin Erdely (left) and Rolling Stone Deputy Managing Editor Sean Woods (far right) walk with their legal team as they head into federal court Tuesday in Charlottesville, Va. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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The Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Va. The fraternity was at the center of a controversial Rolling Stone article describing an alleged gang rape at the school. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

A uniformed tour guide gestures to tourists outside the War Museum in Pyongyang. U.S. citizens can visit North Korea as tourists. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

North Korea Claims It Has U.S. Student In Custody

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A chemical hearth recently discovered in the walls of the Rotunda at the University of Virginia dates back to its Jeffersonian origins. Dan Addison/University of Virginia Communications hide caption

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Dan Addison/University of Virginia Communications

The Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Va. That fraternity was implicated in a now discredited Rolling Stone story about a rape on campus. A dean named in the piece is suing the magazine for $7.85 million. Phi Kappa Psi says it will also sue the magazine. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

An independent review of a Rolling Stone article about an alleged rape at the University of Virginia found fundamental errors in the way the story was reported and edited. University President Teresa Sullivan said the story had damaged campus efforts to address sexual assault. Zach Gibson /Getty Images hide caption

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Report Shreds 'Rolling Stone' Rape Story, But Many On Campus Have Moved On

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Members of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity at the University of Virginia were accused of committing gang-rape in a Rolling Stone article last November. The article was later retracted. A report by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism said the errors behind the article involved "basically every level of Rolling Stone's newsroom." Jay Paul/Getty Images hide caption

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Jay Paul/Getty Images

Report On Retracted 'Rolling Stone' Rape Story Cites 'Systematic Failing'

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The Phi Kappa Psi house at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville was at the center of rape allegations contained in the Rolling Stone story. The magazine acknowledged that its reporting had been flawed, and the campus ban on the fraternity was subsequently lifted. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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The Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Va. The fraternity was at the center of a controversial Rolling Stone article describing an alleged gang rape at the school. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

The University of Virginia is trying to crack down on excessive and underage drinking at fraternities. Jay Paul/Getty Images hide caption

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Jay Paul/Getty Images

U.Va. Looks At Ways To Curb Drinking At Its Frat Houses

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At University Of Virginia, Efforts Born Of Discredited Story Go On

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The Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Va. The fraternity was at the center of gang-rape allegations published in Rolling Stone magazine. The magazine said Friday that there were "discrepancies" in its reporting. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

After Rape Scandal, University Of Virginia Reworks Relationship With Frats

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Saying she is acting out of ""great sorrow, great rage," University of Virginia President Teresa Sullivan, seen here in April, is suspending all the school's fraternities until January. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP