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Scientists Edge Closer To A Blood Test To Detect Cancers

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The Haven for Hope, a homeless shelter in San Antonio, is one of dozens of locations around 20 South Texas counties where people are now being tested for latent tuberculosis infections. Wendy Rigby/Texas Public Radio hide caption

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Wendy Rigby/Texas Public Radio

South Texas Fights Tuberculosis One Blood Test At A Time

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Tracy Solomon Clark didn't realize that the shortness of breath and dizziness she felt at age 44 was actually serious heart disease. Benjamin Brian Morris for NPR hide caption

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Benjamin Brian Morris for NPR

Hidden Heart Disease Is The Top Health Threat For U.S. Women

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"I'm afraid there's a growing sense that the path to health is through testing," says Dr. H. Gilbert Welch, a Dartmouth Institute internist who has written books on the pitfalls of overdiagnosis. Encouraging the worried well to order their own blood tests feeds that mindset, he says. TEK Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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TEK Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

A medical researcher prepares tests for various diseases including Zika. Arnulfo Franco/AP hide caption

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Arnulfo Franco/AP

How Best To Test For Zika Virus?

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Errors in diagnosis, such as inaccuracies or delays in making the information available, account for an estimated 10 percent of patient deaths, a blue-ribbon report says. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

A blood test developed by Harvard researchers checks for evidence of past infection with more than a thousand strains of virus, from about 200 virus families. The swine flu virus shown here, A/CA/4/09, rarely infects humans. C. S. Goldsmith/CDC hide caption

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C. S. Goldsmith/CDC

How Many Viruses Have Infected You?

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When combined with results of other neurological tests, and in the context of a thorough medical history, atrophy of the brain (shown here in an MRI scan) sometimes indicates Alzheimer's. Simon Fraser/Science Source hide caption

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Simon Fraser/Science Source

Many Doctors Who Diagnose Alzheimer's Fail To Tell The Patient

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Johnny Reynolds ignored diabetes symptoms and put off going to the doctor for years when he didn't have health insurance. He was afraid he couldn't afford treatment. Anders Kelto/NPR hide caption

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Anders Kelto/NPR

States That Expand Medicaid Detect More Cases Of Diabetes

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