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human origins

A newborn lies in the maternity ward of the Lens hospital, northern France. A study of crying mice could help explain some building blocks of human infant cries and adult speech. Philippe Huguen/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Huguen/AFP via Getty Images

What crying baby mice could teach us about human speech

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Here's what archaeologists think the Upward Sun River camp in what is now central Alaska looked like 11,500 years ago. Eric S. Carlson and Ben A. Potter/Nature hide caption

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Eric S. Carlson and Ben A. Potter/Nature

Ancient Human Remains Document Migration From Asia To America

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A chimpanzee skull, at left, and a human skull. Scientists are probing why our brains evolved so differently despite many similarities. D. Roberts/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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D. Roberts/Science Photo Library/Getty Images
Katherine Du/NPR

Chew On This: Slicing Meat Helped Shape Modern Humans

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Farming helped fuel the rise of civilizations, but it may also have given us less robust bones. Leemage/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Leemage/UIG via Getty Images

When Humans Quit Hunting And Gathering, Their Bones Got Wimpy

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