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Childhood infections may increase the risk of developing certain mental illnesses in childhood and adolescence. Kathleen Finlay/Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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Kathleen Finlay/Getty Images/Image Source

Kristopher Kelly near his home in Concrete, Wash., in February. He broke his pelvis and all his ribs in a work accident last year. The resulting infection he developed in the hospital almost killed him. Ian C. Bates for NPR hide caption

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Ian C. Bates for NPR

Did An IV Cocktail Of Vitamins And Drugs Save This Lumberjack From Sepsis?

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A 4-year-old regulation in New York state requires doctors and hospitals to treat sepsis using a protocol that some researchers now question. Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Are State Rules For Treating Sepsis Really Saving Lives?

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Handshake-Free Zones Target Spread Of Germs In The Hospital

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A newborn has its umbilical cord cut after birth in a Nigerian hospital. In a contest last week, MBA students came up with plans to get moms and dads to use an antiseptic on the cord stump to ward off infection. Courtesy of Karen Kasmauski/USAID's flagship Maternal and Child Survival Program hide caption

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Courtesy of Karen Kasmauski/USAID's flagship Maternal and Child Survival Program