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Shirley Chisholm, the first Black woman elected to U.S. Congress was running for president in 1972 when she had a remarkable interaction with the pro-segregation George Wallace, then governor of Alabama. Her efforts to build bridges with him ultimately changed his point of view. She's pictured here giving a speech at Laney Community College during her presidential campaign. Howard Erker/Oakland Tribune-MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Howard Erker/Oakland Tribune-MediaNews Group via Getty Images

Lessons from brain science — and history's peacemakers — for resolving conflicts

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Rescuers remove rubble at the maternity ward of the Vilniansk Multidisciplinary Hospital in Ukraine, one of the countries experiencing an increase in violence against health care workers. Dmytro Smolienko/Ukrinform/Future Publishing via Getty Images hide caption

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Dmytro Smolienko/Ukrinform/Future Publishing via Getty Images

Rohingya refugees at a work training center in Indonesia's Aceh province. Dr. Paul Spiegel of Johns Hopkins University's Center for Humanitarian Health is looking at the data that have been collected on refugees and other vulnerable populations. It's far from complete, he says, but he has been surprised by the impact of COVID-19 among Rohingya. Khalis Surry/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Khalis Surry/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

On the first day of the Soviet withdrawal from Afghanistan in May 1988, an Afghan soldier hands a flag to a departing Soviet soldier in Kabul. "This was the first time journalists had full access to Kabul," Robert Nickelsberg says. It marked his first year covering Afghanistan. "It was a historical turning point for the Cold War and actually foreshadows the chaos that will descend on the country." Courtesy of Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Courtesy of Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

Dr. Mohammed Arif helps treat a wounded patient at a field hospital in Kobani, Syria. Most of the clinics in this besieged Syrian border town are now in ruins. Only one still stands, its location kept secret lest it be targeted. Jake Simkin/AP hide caption

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Jake Simkin/AP