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racial disparities

A recent study found that black doctors were more effective than non-black doctors at convincing black men to use preventative health services. Angela Hsieh hide caption

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Angela Hsieh

People Like Us: How Our Identities Shape Health And Educational Success

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Black mothers are more likely than white mothers to die during pregnancy or delivery or in the year following. JGI/Tom Grill/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

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JGI/Tom Grill/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

Buprenorphine, better known by the brand name Suboxone, helps people with opioid addiction stay in recovery. But it is prescribed far more often to white drug users than to blacks. Craig F. Walker/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Craig F. Walker/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Opioid Addiction Drug Going Mostly To Whites, Even As Black Death Rate Rises

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Dramatic decreases in deaths from lung cancer among African-Americans were particularly notable, according to the American Cancer Society. Siri Stafford/Getty Images hide caption

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Siri Stafford/Getty Images

Demonstrators hold signs and chant in Richmond, Va., on Feb. 2. They were calling for the resignation of Gov. Ralph Northam after a racist photo on his medical school yearbook page came to light. He denies that he is in the photo but admits to once dressing in blackface. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Racist Med School Yearbook Photos? Medicine's Racism Problems Go Even Deeper

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Black men are twice as likely as whites to die from prostate cancer, one of the deadliest cancers that affect males. Tetra Images/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

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Tetra Images/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

Researchers are trying to understand why black and Latino children are more likely to die of certain cancers. FS Productions/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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FS Productions/Blend Images/Getty Images
Trina Dalziel/Illustration Works/Getty Images

Knowing Someone Who Faced Discrimination May Affect Blood Pressure

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Lack of access to quality medical care remains a major factor in higher breast cancer death rates among African-Americans. Deborah Jaffe/Getty Images hide caption

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Deborah Jaffe/Getty Images

Thomas Wydra, the police chief of Hamden, Conn., decided to reform his department's traffic stop criteria after the department was singled out for stopping minority drivers at disproportionately higher rates than whites. After decreasing the number of defective equipment stops, the number of black drivers pulled over fell by 25 percent. Jeff Cohen/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Cohen/NPR

To Reduce Bias, Some Police Departments Are Rethinking Traffic Stops

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Wilson Ramos got a tattoo of his brother's name, Jose "Cheo" Maldonado, inked on his right forearm in memory of Maldonado, who died after a police officer shot him with a stun gun inside a jail cell in East Hartford, Conn. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

Who Gets Tased? First Statewide Study Reveals Racial Disparities

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