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The Jeep logo is seen in the south Denver suburb of Englewood, Colo., on April 15, 2018. Chrysler is recalling more than 330,00 Jeep Grand Cherokees because of a steering wheel issue that may cause drivers to lose control of their vehicles. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

The Tesla company logo is shown in Littleton, Colo., in 2020. Tesla is recalling nearly all of the vehicles it has sold in the U.S. because some warning lights on the instrument panel are too small. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

A worker assembles a 2011 Ford Explorer at the Chicago Assembly Plant in 2010 in Chicago. Ford is recalling nearly 1.9 million Explorers in the 2011-2019 model years over a piece of trim that can detach from the vehicles. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

The logo of Honda Motor Co., is seen in Yokohama, near Tokyo on Dec. 15, 2021. Honda Motor's American arm is recalling more than 2.5 million vehicles in the U.S. due to a fuel pump defect that can increase risks of engine failure or stalling while driving. Koji Sasahara/AP hide caption

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Koji Sasahara/AP

The Toyota logo is seen on Sept. 13 at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. That automaker says it is recalling 1 million vehicles over a defect that could cause airbags not to deploy, increasing the risk of injury. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

Hyundai and Kia are recalling more than 3 million vehicles due to the risk of fire in the engine compartments. Twenty-three separate models are included in the recall, including the 2011 Kia Sorento, seen above at the Los Angeles Auto Show in 2009. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

A long row of unsold 2021 Atlas sports-utility vehicles sits at a Volkswagen dealership in March 2021 in Lakewood, Colo. Certain Atlas SUV vehicles were recalled due to a faulty weight sensor in the front passenger seat, which can switch off that seat's airbag. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Hyundai and Kia are telling owners of over 571,000 SUVs and minivans in the U.S. to park them outdoors because the tow hitch harnesses can catch fire while they are parked or being driven. The Korean automakers are recalling the vehicles. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Ford is recalling about 1.5 million vehicles due to problems with their brake hoses or windshield wipers. It says owners can get those parts replaced for free. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Tesla is recalling nearly 1.1 million vehicles in the U.S. because the windows can pinch a person's fingers when being rolled up. AP/David Zalubowski, File hide caption

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AP/David Zalubowski, File

A 2021 Model 3 sedan sits in a lot at a Tesla dealership in Littleton, Colo., on June 27, 2021. Tesla is recalling nearly 54,000 vehicles because their "Full Self-Driving" software lets them roll through stop signs without coming to a complete halt. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

The GMC logo on display at an auto show in Pittsburgh in 2016. General Motors is recalling more than 400,000 pickup trucks in the U.S. because the side air bags can explode without warning and spew parts into the cabin. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Uber leased cars it knew were unsafe to its drivers in Singapore, according to a report in The Wall Street Journal. Above, Uber's San Francisco headquarters in June. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Volkswagen is recalling nearly 281,500 vehicles in the U.S. because of problems with fuel lines. The company says it knows of no leaks that have resulted in fires. Geoff Robins/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Geoff Robins/AFP/Getty Images

General Motors CEO Mary Barra testifies before a Senate panel July 17 at a hearing about auto safety recalls. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Massive Recalls Give The Auto Industry An Unwanted Record

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