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Rapper Kanye West and President-elect Donald Trump met in 2016 at Trump Tower in New York. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

What The Kanye Controversy Can Teach Us About Black Voters

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Bill Cosby walks after it was announced a verdict is in at the Montgomery County Courthouse for day fourteen of his sexual assault retrial on April 26, 2018 in Norristown, Pennsylvania. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Makela/Getty Images

What is love? Baby don't hurt me. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

In Search Of Black-On-Black Love

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Members of the San Francisco 49ers kneel with teammates during the national anthem before playing the Washington Redskins at FedEx Field in October. Michael Zagaris/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Jackson appears at a news conference in New York in 1992, where it was announced that a marketing agreement had been struck between Jackson and Pepsi-Cola International. Richard Drew/Associated Press hide caption

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Richard Drew/Associated Press

Using Black Celebrities To Push Pop, Pudding And Politics

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Christina Chung for NPR

When 'Where Are You From?' Takes You Someplace Unexpected

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The Code Switch podcast is celebrating its first anniversary. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

From Mourning to 'Moonlight': A Year In Race, As Told By Code Switch

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Demonstrators hold up a Pan-African flag to protest the killing of teenager Michael Brown on Aug. 12, 2014 in Ferguson, Mo. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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On Flag Day, Remembering The Red, Black And Green

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African-American students say they matriculated at Duke Divinity School expecting to enhance their calling with top-notch theological training at a prestigious program. But instead, they say, they entered a racial nightmare. Jackie O/Flickr/Creative Commons hide caption

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Jackie O/Flickr/Creative Commons

Charles Barkley and executive producer Dan Partland speak during the American Race Press Luncheon in May in New York City. Theo Wargo/Getty Images hide caption

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Theo Wargo/Getty Images

Kenya Barris is the executive producer of the family comedy Blackish and Shahidi plays Zoe, the eldest daughter in the Johnson family. There are hopes for a spin-off starring Shahidi's character going off to college. Meanwhile, Barris is piloting a few other TV shows for the fall-- including a comedy starring Felicity Huffman and Courtney B. Vance. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

Talking Black-ish With Star Yara Shahidi And Creator Kenya Barris

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