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Climate change makes intense floods, wildfires, hurricanes and heat waves more common. Recovering from a disaster can be expensive. Here, a flooded car after Hurricane Florence hit South Carolina in 2018. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Rayford/Getty Images

A volunteer takes a break on the rubble of a building in a flash flood-damaged area in Derna on September 14, 2023. The Libyan Red Crescent said Thursday that more than 11,000 were killed in the flood and another 10,000 were still missing. Abdullah Doma/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Abdullah Doma/AFP via Getty Images

Indonesian villagers stand with Mount Semeru in the background on Saturday. Indonesian authorities raised the alert level for the highest volcano on Java island, saying it could blow up again after a sudden eruption earlier this month that killed dozens of people and left thousands homeless in villages that were buried in layers of mud. Hendra Permana/AP hide caption

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Hendra Permana/AP

Timothy Dominique, 62, lives in a donated RV parked next door to the family home where he was staying when Hurricane Laura hit Lake Charles last year. He says he received nothing from FEMA because he does not own the home and didn't have a formal rental agreement. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Why FEMA Aid Is Unavailable To Many Who Need It The Most

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Hurricane Irma damaged homes in the Florida Keys in 2017. A new study finds buildings in the contiguous U.S. are concentrated in disaster-prone areas. Matt McClain/AP hide caption

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Matt McClain/AP

More Than Half Of U.S. Buildings Are In Places Prone To Disaster, Study Finds

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Two hurricanes destroyed bridges, roads, schools, health clinics and homes. Here is the aftermath in Protección in Honduras' Santa Barbara department on Dec. 11. Edison Umanzur/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Edison Umanzur/AFP via Getty Images

Even Disaster Veterans Are Stunned By What's Happening In Honduras

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Sell Or Stay? Australia's Fire Zone Experiment

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Hurricane Florence flooded Nichols, S.C., in September 2018. It was the second catastrophic flood in the region in less than two years. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

When '1-In-100-Year' Floods Happen Often, What Should You Call Them?

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Flames creep along the cedar siding on a test house hit by blown embers at a research facility run by the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Step 1: Build A House. Step 2: Set It On Fire

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First responders walk through a neighborhood heavily damaged by a tornado the day before in Beauregard, Ala., on Monday. The death toll from the storm stands at 23, with victims ranging in age from 6 to 93. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Workers begin repairs to a wall that was lost in the wake of Hurricane Harvey on Wednesday in Rockport, Texas. Most insurance policies don't cover flooding damage. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

In Storm-Tossed Houston Area, Most Homeowners Lack Flood Insurance

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