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Audra Palacio walks with her father Peter Palacio back to their house. The house is part of an affordable housing plan called Nehemiah. The Palacios moved here in 1983, when Audra was six years old. Kholood Eid for NPR hide caption

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Kholood Eid for NPR

The American Dream: One Block Can Make All The Difference

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Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson arrives to testify at a hearing of the House Financial Services Committee on Capitol Hill on June 27, 2018. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Why Charlotte Is One Of Ben Carson's Models For HUD's Work Requirements

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Cairo, Ill., is one of the fastest depopulating communities in the nation, with abandoned buildings throughout the river town. The federal government plans to demolish two public housing projects where many of the remaining residents live. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Carson Promises To Help Residents Of Housing Projects His Department Is Shutting Down

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Federal housing policies created after the Depression ensured that African-Americans and other people of color were left out of the new suburban communities — and pushed instead into urban housing projects, such as Detroit's Brewster-Douglass towers. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

A 'Forgotten History' Of How The U.S. Government Segregated America

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A man walks by the Farragut Houses, a public housing project in Brooklyn, N.Y. The budget blueprint President Trump released Thursday calls for the cutting of billions of dollars in funding from the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Advocates Say Trump Budget Cuts Will Hurt Country's Most Vulnerable

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Comcast's discounted program, called Internet Essentials, is expanding beyond families with schoolchildren. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Mercy, a San Francisco-­based nonprofit, provides subsidized affordable housing for low-income residents, including 25 apartments reserved for 18- to 24-­year-­olds. Shawn Wen/Youth Radio hide caption

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Shawn Wen/Youth Radio

In San Francisco, An Affordable Housing Solution That Helps Millennials

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Bobbie Jennings, 69, stands outside her home in the Harmony Oaks housing development in New Orleans. Jennings says that she misses the sense of community of the Magnolia projects, the nickname of the C.J. Peete projects that Harmony Oaks replaced. Edmund D. Fountain for NPR hide caption

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Edmund D. Fountain for NPR

After Katrina, New Orleans' Public Housing Is A Mix Of Pastel And Promises

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Reginald Britt first moved into the Taft Houses, a public housing complex in East Harlem, in 1976 Alexandra Starr hide caption

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Alexandra Starr

Can New York Police Build Trust Among Public Housing Residents?

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A resident of Lathrop Homes leaves one of the few occupied buildings in the development. The city wants to redevelop the public housing as mixed use, and offered vouchers to encourage residents to relocate. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

A Chicago Community Puts Mixed-Income Housing To The Test

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Ephraim Benton, a former resident of Tompkins Houses in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn, is now an actor. Benton started a community-based organization called Beyond Influencing Da Hood, which puts on health fairs, film festivals and various free community events in his old housing project. This photo was taken in front of his old building in Tompkins Houses. Courtesy of Shino Yanagawa hide caption

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Courtesy of Shino Yanagawa

An Exhibit Offers A Different Angle On Life In Public Housing

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