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Mozambique

The Sardar Sweet Shop in Varanasi, India, was built around a neem tree considered too holy to cut down. Customers flow in and out, barely noticing the imposing tree. In rural parts, people use the neem tree's leaves to repel insects, the sap for stomach pain and the branches to brush their teeth. As for the candy shop sweets, Diane Cook says they were "fabulous." Diane Cook and Len Jenshel hide caption

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Diane Cook and Len Jenshel

Every day, hundreds of patients wait to be seen at the Munhava health center in Mozambique's port city of Beira. Morgana Wingard hide caption

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Morgana Wingard

The Sole Doctor In The Hospital Shoulders The Burden Of HIV

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The alleyway known as the Beira "corridor" is part of the city's informal prostitution zone, where sex workers wait to meet clients. Gianluigi Guercia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gianluigi Guercia/AFP/Getty Images

Fighting HIV In Two High-Risk Groups: Sex Workers And Truck Drivers

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Sweet potato evangelist Maria Isabel Andrade drives around Mozambique in her orange Toyota Land Cruiser in 2012. She is one of four researchers honored with the World Food Prize for promoting the crop to combat malnutrition. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

A Maasai boy and his dog, near the skeleton of an elephant killed by poachers outside of Arusha, Tanzania, in 2013. Jason Straziuso/AP hide caption

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Jason Straziuso/AP

DNA Tracking Of Ivory Helps Biologists Find Poaching Hotspots

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A year after his cancer diagnosis, Henning Mankell is working on a new novel, and he just directed Shakespeare's Hamlet in his adopted country of Mozambique. Pep Bonet/NOOR/Redux hide caption

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Pep Bonet/NOOR/Redux

A total of 69 people died this weekend after drinking traditional beer in northwestern Mozambique. Here, men load the coffins of victims onto a pickup truck at the Chitima health center in Tete province Sunday. -/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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-/AFP/Getty Images